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WILLIAM A. DEXTER 
Director of Guidance 



WITH GRATITUDE AND APPRE- 
CIATION, we the Class of i960, acknowl- 
edge the willing aid and understanding 
guidance of William A. Dexter. 



"All the world's a stage and all the men and women 
merely players." This is an apt phrase for 'the theme of 
the i960 Yearbook, quoted from the works of a great 
scholar. Players you will be on the stage of life. Some of 
you will take the leading parts. Many of you will be the 
technicians behind the scenes who, by your technology 
and knowledge of sound and lighting efTects, will add 
realism to the performance. There will be some of you 
who, by your talent and genius, will create the play, 
produce and direct the production. Others will have a 
small bit to play and possibly will not be noticed by the 
audience, nor make headlines. 

For the past twelve years you have been rehearsing 
your parts and improving your skills, but for most of you 
the opening night and even the dress rehearsal lie four 
years or more beyond. The final days of rehearsal will be 
more arduous than the first, but if you have learned your 
parts well, yours will be the satisfaction of a "smash hit" 
and a very successful season. To you who will soon be- 
come players on the great world's stage, I offer the words 
of James Russell Lowell's "Inspiration for Living" : 
"Life is a leaf of paper white 
Whereon each one of us may write 
His word or two, and then comes night; 



Greatly begin ! Tho' thou hast time 

But for a line, be that sublime ! 

Not failure, but low aim, is crime." 

WILLIAM A. DEXTER 
Director of Guidance 



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The roles a man can play in his time are as 
varied as his abilities and determination. Only 
by the most consistent and conscientious efforts 
will one's entire talents be realized. The past 
years have been a trying rehearsal, preparing 
us for our debut on the stage of life. Now, for us, 
the rehearsal has ended and "All the world's 
a stage." 





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MR. HERRSCHAFT, OUR SUPERINTENDENT 
OF SCHOOLS, is now retiring after many years of 
devoted service. His plans and decisions have always 
been guided by his sincere interest in education and 
young people. 







HOWARD G. HERRSCHAFT 

Superintendent of Schools 



"All the world's a stage." Here is a theme for your year book that challenges the 
imagination! Each of us has thoughts peculiarly ours and, in this regard, I am no excep- 
tion. May I suggest that, as you read these words of mine and other material in this 
publication, you consider more than one aspect of your chosen theme. 

While you consider your theme as developed by your editorial staff and by the mem- 
bers of the Administration to whom you have granted the privilege of adding their con- 
tributions, may I ask you to pause long enough to reflect that if you mistakenly let this 
theme lead you to consider life only as a play to be acted, you will do yourselves an 
injustice. 

How true are many of the implications of this idea! We appear but briefly in the 
continuing flow of human activity. At times our individual contributions seem so unim- 
portant that we can easily consider ourselves cast in minor roles. This judgment lends 
emphasis to the point that I am trying to make: One is cast in a part in this "play" and 
only within well defined limits can one make much of a contribution. 

How much more does life hold? It is important to realize that while we are not 
necessarily wholly subject to the Whims of forces outside of our control, we may, to a 
large degree, determine by ambition and wisdom what we may become. 

Insofar as we are self-determinant does life have meaning for us. The discontent so 
frequently seen among us probably is due to the fact that we have failed to assume our 
natural place in human activity that can in a real sense be fully satisfying to us. 

May I make a special comment to the members of the class of I960? You, and I, 
too, will be severing our connection with this Longmeadow School Department at about 
the same time. I trust that, as you leave, you will have many fond memories as I shall 
have. I trust that all of us many continue to look back at the work we have done here 
with satisfaction. If, through my efforts to do my work well, I have helped you to achieve 
richer and fuller lives, I shall be content. May God's rich blessing go with you as you go 
your individual ways. 




You will be portraying yourself as you face audiences 
throughout life from your stage. You will be both author 
and actor of the various roles you will be playing. It will be 
your opportunity and your responsibility to determine your 
parts and to act them. These are precious rights made pos- 
sible for you by those who fought and died to establish and 
pass them on to you. They are yours to enjoy, but yours also 
to preserve and strengthen for those who are coming after 
you. 

Who will you be and how will you portray yourself as 
your life unfolds and you go from scene to scene? No better 
guide has been offered to youth with your cultural back- 
ground than that contained in Shakespeare's famous lines: 
"This above all, to thine own self be true, and it must fol- 
low as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to 
any man." 

QUENTIN REYNOLDS 

Chairman — Longmeadow School Committee 




Seated left to right: Mr. Robert Brigham, 
Mr. Henry Frisbie, Mr. Quentin Reynolds, 
Mrs. Kyle C. Whitefield, and Mr. Richard 
Holter 



There is an excitement and a challenge in the realization 
that we as individuals have a wide range of personal free- 
dom in selecting the roles we will play in life. However, 
Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken" suggests to sojuie of us 
the weight of responsibility which attends our choosing one 
course of action over others. Indeed it appears that as night 
follows day responsibility for our choices follows our free- 
dom to choose. 

To grant this sobering premise immediately raises the 
question as to how we can select more wisely the roles we 
will play. Must we conclude only that our reactions at a 
given time will depend upon the situation and that "When 
in Rome, we will do as the Romans do"? Of course not! 
But yet, how do we make better decisions? To fail to choose 
is itself a type of choice, a decision to do nothing. This re- 
quires no courage, no faith. 

There are three fundamental steps in selecting our be- 
havior roles more intelligently. The first is to secure and 
evaluate fairly the facts in a given case. It is often more 
difficult to face the facts than to secure them. The second 
step is to formulate the reasonable alternative courses of 
action suggested by the facts. To overlook a meaningful 
solution to a problem can be as detrimental in decision 
making as to overlook factual data. The last step is to try to 
predict the consequences of each alternative role. 

Two basic questions come to mind as we weigh alterna- 
tive courses of action. What effect will our behavior have 
on persons around us, our associates, our friends, our loved 
ones? What will be the consequences of the action upon us 
as persons; will our action make us wiser, more tolerant, 
more loyal, i.e., better human beings? Our answers to these 
questions will influence greatly our final decision. 
W. HENRY CONE 
8 Assistant Superintendent of Schools 



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Your twelve-year-long rehearsal is over. Your producers, 
directors and technical advisors have coached you through 
arduous months of learning and playing. You have missed 
cues, fluffed lines, encountered interruptions but you have 
progressed steadily. All you have been taught during re- 
hearsals is now behind you. Each one of you can play the 
role he chooses, and each role, though possibly not a lead- 
ing part, can be important. 

In this materialistic age, the props and settings too often 
seem to dominate the individual dignity of players on the 
stage — a lavish scene may get more plaudits than a well- 
played part. Sometimes we tend to judge not by accom- 
plishment and character but by properties. 

The script is yours to write, and you are audience as well 
as players. If you can relegate the props to minor places, 
put emphasis on character and individual worth, give 
credits for knowledge, skill, and service to the world, keep 
your respect for self and man, and for God, Who is your 
Final Critic, you will have mastered, not the art of acting, 
but the greater art of living. 

Play the part first! Trim the stage last. 

HUGH O. MACFARLANE 
Principal 



You are now ready to be cast in another "act" in the 
greatest play of all — life. As you venture forth in this new 
role, remember that kindness and cheerfulness will add 
color, vitality and significance to your part. Play this part, at 
all times, with the Golden Rule uppermost in mind. Each 
individual has a job to do in this great "play." Do it in a 
friendly, cooperative spirit which in turn will add'meaning 
and happiness to your life as well as to the lives of those 
around you. — However, do not be afraid to think, to create, 
and to believe for yourself. God meant for you to be an 
individual with your own individual characteristics. Don't 
be ashamed of them. Continue to struggle. Thomas Paine 
once wrote "What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too 
lightly; it is dearness only that gives everything its value." 
If you attain one goal, strive for a more worthwhile one. 
Life need never be commonplace and routine; it's all in the 
attitude and point of view that one takes. 

RALPH L. SHINDLER 
Assistant Principal 




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MR. OLIVIO LOPES 




The object of the English Department is to improve and 
develop the student's ability in verbal expression. Graded 
vocabulary lists and grammar units provide a general back- 
ground in mechanics of expression. Perceptive and sensitive 
reading is stressed in an introduction to cultural relation- 
ships. To achieve this, a background in general literature is 
provided for freshmen followed the next two years by 
specific study of American and English literature. In the 
senior year, world literature is surveyed with emphasis in 
the advanced classes on the literary works of ancient civili- 
zations. 



MISS NANCY EATON 




12 




MR. JOHN WARNER 



MRS. AMANDA WANEGAR 






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MISS GLADYS JENSEN 





MR. JACK BARSUM 



MR. HOWARD BURKE 



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The library facilitates additional research in the courses 
presented at the high school. In addition to reference mate- 
rial, there are periodicals and non-fiction books of interest 
to the student body for their pleasure reading. Miss Baird 
is assisted in her duties by student Library Aides. 



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MR. JOHN HASKELL 





A comprehensive knowledge of past events is essential 
to an understanding of the present world situation. The his- 
tory program at Longmeadow High School affords the stu- 
dent an opportunity to study both past and present civiliza- 
tions of the world. In the freshman year, the department 
offers semester courses: government, the first, is concerned 
with political theory and its practical applications; geog- 
raphy, the second, with world's natural features and their 
effect on economics. A world civilization siirvey from the 
Stone Age through World War II is presented to soph- 
omores, followed the next year by specific study of the 
political, economic, and social aspects of our country. As a 
senior, the student can relate his interpretation of the past 
to his understanding of the present either in the subjects 
of contemporary civilization or modern problems. 



MR. STANLEY URSPRUNG 



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MR. LOUIS JOSSELYN 



MR. ORSEN JOLY 



MR. BRUCE RYDER 






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MISS ONAITA MacINTYRE 



The present age offers a challenge to mankind unparalleled 
throughout history. Because of ease and swiftness of the 
transportation in this era, the world's vast expanses are con- 
stantly shrinking and its peoples are being drawn together. 
It is, therefore, imperative that common understanding 
among nations and their citizens be attained. To this end, 
widespread linguistic skill is an important advance. 

Because Longmeadow High School is aware of this need, 
its curriculum offers the student a sound program in foreign 
languages. Basic two-year or more comprehensive three- and 
four-year courses are provided in Latin and French by in- 
structors who are specialists in their fields. Achievement in 
the knowledge of the language itself, as well as insight into 
culture, ideals, and aspirations of a foreign society are the 
dual purposes of these courses. 

Nota Bene — Nous etudions bien les tongues 
a Longmeadow High School. 




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MRS. GLADYS LEAB 





MR. EDMOND HOULE 



MRS DARLENE ALONZO 



MRS ANN PELCZARSKI 




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MR.' MAURICE SUHER 



MRS. PATRICIA McTAGGAR 




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MR. GEORGE ALDRICH 



The MATHEMATICAL COURSES presented at Long- 
meadow High School are designed to build a solid back- 
ground in a wide range of both theoretical and practical 
mathematics. The field of study includes algebra I and II, 
plane geometry, business mathematics, applied mathema- 
tics, and advanced mathematics. The last, Math IV, is a 
combination of trigonometry, solid geometry, analytical 
geometry, and an introduction to the calculus. The mathemat- 
ical curriculum fulfills the requirements of many students 
of varying abilities and interests. 




16 




MR. ROBERT NESS 



MRS. CAROLYN TOPOR 











MR. CHARLES ZAPSALIS 



MR. EDWARD PRATT 



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The SCIENCE DEPARTMENT at Longmeadow High 
School offers courses for both fundamental and specific 
study, depending upon the individual interests of the stu- 
dent. The courses presented include: general science, a re- 
quired freshman subject; biology, either college preparatory 
or applied; chemistry; and physics. In college preparatory 
biology as well as chemistry and physics, laboratory work is 
required. To provide for increasing enrollment in the lab- 
oratory sciences, two more classrooms for scientific exper- 
iment have be^n added within the new wing. 




MR. JAMES CLIMO 




17 




MR. WILLIAM AHERN 



MR. EDWIN FINKLEHOFFE 













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MR. ROBERT DAGOSTINO 




MISS DANCY KELSEY 



C^ducation 




The PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
program is designed to develop co- 
ordinated skills, recreation, sports- 
manship, and leadership in the high 
school student. The course attempts 
to guide individual growth, both 
emotional and social, as well as 
physical. These important factors of 
maturity are the reasons physical 
education is a required course. The 
subject includes participation in sea- 
sonal competitive sports, after which 
knowledge and skill tests are given. 
To measure strength development, 
annual physical fitness tests are ad- 
ministrated. With the assistance of 
the Boys and Girls Leaders' Club, 
the department also organizes an ac- 
tive program of intramural sports. 





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MR. VLADIMIR DANKEVICH 



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COMMERCIAL SUBJECTS offer pupils training for direct participa- 
tion in business as well as preparation for advanced work at business 
schools and colleges. The curriculum includes typewriting, in which 
the emphasis is placed on speed and accuracy, and stenography, the 
aim of which is the mastery of the shorthand theory in writing and 
reading. The basic principles, skills, and procedures of business are 
taught in bookkeeping and office practices. A background course, gen- 
eral business training, is concerned with the relationships that exist 
between personal and national welfare and business activities. 







MRS. SARAH HOWE 




The INDUSTRIAL ARTS pro- 
gram, which includes the courses of 
mechanical drawing and personal 
use shop, deals with several types 
of exploratory shop work. A gen- 
eral knowledge and an appreciation 
of industry are stressed in addition 
to an introduction to the use of ma- 
chines, tools, and measuring instru- 
ments. The courses emphasize basic 
electrical principles and the safe use 
of hand, machine, and precision 
power tools. 




MISS LJLLIAN ERICKSON 



MR. JOHN ROSSITER 



The aim of the ARTS AND 
CRAFTS courses is to aid the stu- 
dent to express himself more effec- 
tively through creative activity in 
the visual and plastic arts. The basic 
principles of color, shape, and design 
are taught first. After these are mas- 
tered, the program stresses the three 
major creative areas: crafts, commer- 
cial arts, and fine arts. Thus the stu- 
dent is given an opportunity to 
explore the many fields of art for a 
media of expression. 







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The MUSIC COURSES provide 
for the enjoyment of music through 
both listening and performing. The 
program includes song-fests and con- 
certs for the entire student body, as 
well as Glee Club, Chorus, and 
"Lyrics" for selected vocal students. 
The instrumental groups are the 
band, orchestra, and dance band. 
Another important area in this field 
is the music appreciation and har- 
mony course. Thus the department 
offers all students an opportunity to 
enjoy music through personal par- 
ticipation and analytic interpretation. 



The function of the HOUSE- 
HOLD ARTS department is to de- 
velop in girls the desire and ability 
to improve their personal poise and 
their surroundings. The program in- 
cludes units in table settings, home 
furnishings, flower arrangements, 
and food preservation, preparation, 
and service. The girls are taught ad- 
ditional domestic skills in clothing 
selection and construction, groom- 
ing, modeling, home nursing, and 
child development. These many fac- 
ets of personal planning are co-ordi- 
nated in the highlight of the year, 
the annual fashion show. 




19 



MR. WILFRED BURKLE 



MRS. GERTRUDE BLAKEBOROUGH 





MRS. ERNESTINE WASHBURN 



MRS. ELIZABETH LOW 



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MRS. DORIS BOWMAN 



MRS. MARION PURDY 







MRS. MARIAN MARTIN 



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Left to right: Mrs. Helen Evans, Mrs. Margaret Fox, Mrs. Naomi 
Saabye, Mrs. Grace McAfee, Mrs. Marion Carlson, and Mrs. Elizabeth 
Goodrich. 



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CLASS 

OFFICERS 




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PRESIDENT 

WILLIAM COX 

Bill 
121 South Park Avenue 
Leadership is something of the heart 
and the head. Eisenhower 
Class President 4; Leaders' Club; Traffic 
Squad — Captain 3, 4; Masacksic — 
Sports Editor 3, 4; Lyrics; Glee Club; 
Debating Society; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; Hockey; Track; Intramurals. 



VICE-PRESIDENT 

ROBERT A. MacDONNELL 

Mac 
63 Falmouth Road 
The reward of one duty is the power 
to fulfill another. Eliot 
Dartmouth Book Award 3; Marshal for 
Graduating Class of 1959; Junior Prom 
King; Student Council — President 4; 
Class President 3; Class Vice-President 
4; Leaders' Club; Traffic Squad — Cap- 
tain 4; Masacksic — Boys' Sports Editor 
4; Junior Prom Committee; Football — 
Captain 4; J.V. Basketball; Baseball; 
Intramurals. 



24 





CLASS ADVISORS 
During our years at Longmeadow High School, our 
advisors have devoted much of their time to the prob- 
lems of our class. Now we thank Miss Maclntyre, 
who has been our advisor for all four years; Mr. 
Climo, who assisted us our freshman year; and Mr. 
Pratt, our advisor for the past three years. Their 
guidance and encouragement have contributed much 
to our high school success as the class of I960. 



TREASURER 

JOAN MOHRMAN 

92 Longview Drive 
Work is only done when it's done with 
a will. Ruskin 

National Honor Society 3, 4; Usher for 
Graduating Class of 1959; Girls' State 
Alternate 3; Student Council; Class 
Treasurer 1, 2, 3, 4; Leaders' Club 
Masacksic; Chorus; Cafeteria Aide 
French Club; Junior Prom Committee 
Drill Team; Sport Night. 





SECRETARY 

SUSAN LESTER THOMAS 

Sue 
32 Sylvan Place 
Beauty is a silent recommendation . Syrus 
Junior Prom Queen; Class Secretary 1, 
2, 3, 4; Masacksic; Glee Club; Red 
Cross Club; Junior Prom Committee; 
Sport Night. 



25 




H. WILLIAM ADAMS, III 

Bill 
1175 Longmeadow Street 
The social, friendly, honest man. Burns 
Masacksic — Business Co-editor 4; Jet 
Jotter, "Our Town" — cast; Dramatic 
Club; Lyrics; Glee Club; Chorus; Cafe- 
teria Aide; Latin Club; Junior Prom 
Committee; Tennis; Intramurals. 



CARYL LYNDA ABRAMS 

604 Laurel Street 
Learn to live, and live to learn. Taylor 
Essay Contest — 3rd prize 3; Masacksic; 
Glee Club; Chorus; Debating Society; 
Junior Achievement Bank; Latin Club; 
French Club. 





BRUCE WINSLOW ALDRICH 

111 Colton Place 
There is a certain blend of courage and 
character. Adamic 

Essay Contest — Honorable Mention 1, 
1st prize 3; Lyrics; Glee Club; Orches- 
tra — President 3; Dance Band; Band; 
Cafeteria Aide; Track. 



DAVID SEWALL ADAMS 

Dave 
109 Field Road 
It is of little traits that character is com- 
posed. Winer 

Lyrics; Glee Club; Band; Intramurals. 





CAROLINE CLEAVELAND 
ALMGREN 

Keeg 
42 Dartmouth Road 
/ like to walk among the beautiful 
things. Santayana 

Masacksic; Cycloramists; Junior Prom 
Committee; Drill Team; Sport Night. 



SANDRA ELAINE ALBANO 

Sandy 
408 Maple Road 
Fond of fun as fond can be. Sayers 
Essay Contest — 2nd prize 1; French 
Club; Junior Prom Committee; Sport 
Night. 



26 





DONALD BAIRD 

Skip 
31 Villa Street 
Rascals are always sociable. Schopen- 
hauer 

Masacksic; Glee Club; Soccer; Football; 
Hockey, Baseball; Tennis; Intramurals. 



ARTHUR ALEXANDER 
ARNOLD, III 

Alec 

22 Warren Terrace 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1957) 

By and by is easily said. Shakespeare 

Intramurals. 





BARBARA J. BIONDI 

Mouse 
111 Maple Road 
Common sense is not so common. Vol- 
taire 

Jet jotter — Bookkeeper 4; Chorus; Of- 
fice Aide; Red Cross Club; Business 
Club. 



THOMAS F. ASTALDI 

Tom 

81 Lincoln Park 

A man is born for happiness. Frank 

Leaders' Club; Traffic Squad; Soccer; 

J.V. Basketball; Baseball; Intramurals. 





JOHN HARRISON BALDWIN 

Beats 
280 Burbank Road 
An easy going soul, and always was. 
Aristophanes 

Masacksic; ]et Jotter; Glee Club; De- 
bating Society; Red Cross Club; Intra- 
murals. 



27 



BEVERLY JANE BIONDI 

Bev 
1 1 1 Maple Road 
He wins much who wants little. Sham- 
mai 

Jet Jotter; Glee Club; Business Club — 
Treasurer 4. 




ELLIOT M. L. BLOOM 

El 
1 1 Hazelwood Avenue 
Wisdom, wit and power meet. Gould 
National Honor Society 3 — President 
4; Usher for Graduating Class of 1959 
Harvard Book Award; Traffic Squad 
Masacksic — Photography Editor 3, 4 
Jet Jotter; Audio-Visual Aids Club 
Photography Club — Treasurer 1, Presi- 
dent 3; Latin Qub; French Club. 





ROBERT JACKSON BULLIONS, 
III 

Bob 
51 Meadow Road 
Thought will not' work except in silence. 
Carlyle 

Band; Junior Prom Committee; Intra- 
murals. 



CAROL ANN BOLTRUCYK 

Tiger 
159 Hazardville Road 
Woman is not made to be questioned. 
Young 

Drum Majorette; Office Aide; Red Cross 
Club; Business Qub — President 4. 





DONNA P. BREGLIO 

327 Maple Road 
A woman, generally speaking, is gen- 
erally speaking. Anonymous 
Masacksic; Jet Jetter; Cycloramists; 
Chorus; Office Aide; Business Club — 
Vice-President 3; Junior Prom Commit- 
tee; Sport Night. 



28 



JOAN DIANE BLOOM 

274 Converse Street 
Hitch your wagon to a star. Emerson 
National Honor Society 3, 4 — Secre- 
tary 3; Usher for Graduating Class of 
1959; Glee Club; Governor's Aide; 
"Spotlight on Youth" Reporter; Masack- 
sic; Jet Jotter — General News Editor 4; 
"Our Town" — Cast; "January Thaw" 
— Cast; "The Matchmaker" — Cast; 
Latin Club; French Club; Dramatic 
Club; Lyrics; Orchestra — Secretary 3; 
Junior Prom Committee; Cheerleader; 
Drill Team; Sport Night. 





LYNNE CASAL 

Nena 

9 Leetewood Drive 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1959) 

Great art is the expression of a pure 

soul. Ruskin 

Masacksic. 



SARAH BROOKS CASWELL 

Sara 

15 Woodsley Road 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1957) 

The less of routine, the more of life. 

Alcott 

Masacksic; Glee Club; Junior Prom 
Committee; Sport Night. 





CHARLES HOWARD CLARK 

Charlie 
57 Belleclaire Avenue 
A happy heart goes all the day. Un- 
known 

Glee Club; Orchestra; Dance Band; 
Band; Library Aide; Audio-Visual Aids 
Club; Photography Club; Junior Prom 
Committee; Soccer; J.V. Basketball; J.V. 
Baseball; Intramurals. 



DAVID CHRISTENSEN 

Dave 
24 Dartmouth Road 
Quietness is best. Holland 
Orchestra; Band; Audio-Visual Aids 
Club; Latin Club; Junior Prom Commit- 
tee; Track; Bowling; Intramurals. 





MICHAEL N. CIMINI 

Mike 

64 Nevins Avenue 

Wit is the salt of conversation. Hazlitt 

Traffic Squad; Library Aide; Latin Club; 

Junior Prom Committee; Intramurals. 




BARBARA ANN CHAPIN 

Chape 
72 Crescent Road 
Charm is a woman's strength. Ellis 
Leaders' Club; Masacksic — Sales Co- 
editor 4; Jet Jotter — Girls' Sports Ed- 
itor 4; French Club; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; Drill Team — Co-captain 3, 
Captain 4; Sport Night. 





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KENDALL CLARK 

Ken 
56 Hazelwood Avenue 
(Entered Longmeadow October, 
1958) 
The wrong way always seems more rea- 
sonable. Moore. 

Science Fair — Honorable Mention 3; 
Lyrics; Glee Club; Orchestra; Band; 
Track. 



29 




VIRGINIA WHITING COOK 

Ginnie 
91 Wenonah Road 
Laugh when we must, be candid when 
we can. Pope 

Masacksic; Glee Club; Debating Society; 
Red Cross Club; Latin Club; French 
Club; Junior Prom Committee; Sport 
Night. 



MARCIA DALE CLARK 

341 Converse Street 
All the charm of all the muses. Tenny- 
son 

Science Fair — 3rd prize 3; National 
Scholastic An Gold Key Award 3; 
Masacksic; Cycloramists; Chorus; Glee 
Club; Drill Team; Sports Night. 





MARIE COULOMB 

76 Birchwood Avenue 
Only a life lived for others is a life 
worthwhile. Einstein 
]et Jotter; Glee Club; Junior Prom 
Committee. 



JUDITH ANN COHEN 

Judi 
547 Converse Street 
Blessed is the man whose heart bears no 
malice. Apocrypha 

Chorus; Latin Club; French Club; Jun- 
ior Prom Committee; Sport Night. 





WILLIAM H. CRAFT 

' Willy 

197 Greenacre Avenue 

An easy friend and companion. Pope 

Junior Prom Committee; Football; J.V. 

Basketball; Intramurals. 



COLWELL PARKER CORT 

Doc 
119 Viscount Road 
The apparel oft proclaims the man. 
Shakespeare 
Football; Baseball; Intramurals. 



30 





ELINE GADE DIERAUF 

466 Laurel Street 
Nothing great was ever achieved with- 
out enthusiasm. Emerson 
Leaders' Club — President 4; Masacksic 
— Girls' Sports Editor 4; Glee Club; 
Red Cross Club; French Club; Junior 
Prom Committee; White Team Captain; 
Drill Team; Sport Night 



WILLIAM EMERSON CRAIG 

Bill 
10 Chatham Road 
The real New England Yankee. Salton- 
stall 

Glee Club; Audio-Visual Aids Club; 
Latin Club — Treasurer 4; Intramurals. 




MICHAEL P. DeVYLDER 

Rodent 
441 Maple Road 
What should a man do but be merry? 
Shakespeare 
Intramurals; Junior Prom Committee. 





BRIAN J. DOHERTY 

Flash 
84 Wheelmeadow Road 
(Entered Longmeadow September, 
1957) 
Ingenuity will shine in a man. Jacobs 
Science Fair — 4th prize 3, Hampden 
Medical Award 3; Traffic Squad; Foot- 
ball; J.V. Baseball; Intramurals. 



31 




VIRGINIA LOUISE DOW 

Ginny 
59 Summit Avenue 
Personality is the measure of attraction's 
power. Thomas 

National Honor Society 4; Marshal for 
Graduating Class of 1959; Essay Con- 
test — Honorable Mention 1; Girls' 
State; Student Council; Leaders' Club; 
Masacksic — Girls' Sports Editor 4; Jet 
Jotter — Co-editor 4; "The Match- 
maker" — Cast; Dramatic Club; Glee 
Club; Chorus; Red Cross Club — Sec- 
retary 3; Latin Club; French Club; Jun- 
ior Prom Committee; Cheerleader — 
Captain 4; Sport Night. 



MARGARET ANN DOYLE 

Peggy 
101 Belleclaire Avenue 
All occupations are cheered and light- 
ened by music. Bryant 
Essay Contest — Honorable Mention 1 ; 
Lyrics; Glee Club; Chorus; Junior Prom 
Committee. 




C. DAVID DuBUISSON 

Dave 
117 Pleasantview Avenue 
// there is any mystery in the world, it 
is individuality. Baech 
Jet Jotter — Business Manager 4; "The 
Matchmaker" — Cast; Dramatic Club 
Audio-Visual Aids Club; Library Aide 
Photography Club — Vice-President 3 
French Club; Junior Prom Committee 
Intramurals. 





CONSTANCE GAVIN 

Connie 
35 Roseland Terrace 
Sugar and spice' and all things nice. 
Southey 

Cycloramists; Glee Club; French Club; 
Junior Prom Committee; Sport Night. 



EDWARD W. FLAGLER 

Ed 
603 Laurel Street 
He has lived well, laughed often, and 
loved much. Anderson 
Essay Contest — Honorable Mention 3; 
Junior Prom Committee; Soccer; J.V. 
Basketball; J.V. Baseball; Intramurals. 





DUNCAN REED FORDYCE 

Dune 
99 Oxford Road 
A good folly is worth what you pay for 
it. Ade 

Masacksic; Cycloramists; Audio-Visual 
Aids Club; Photography Club; Junior 
Prom Committee; Track. 



DOUGLASS NORTH ELLIS, JR. 

Doug 

1 54 Pleasantview Avenue 
It's not the gag, it's how you deliver it. 
Berle 

Essay Contest — 1st prize 1, 2nd prize 
3; Latin Club; Masacksic — Sales Co- 
chairman 4; Audio-Visual Aids Club; 
Junior Prom Committee; Football; In- 
tramurals. 



32 





ELSIE GILMOUR 

90 Woolworth Street 
To persevere in one's duty and be silent. 
Washington 
Junior Prom Committee; Sport Night. 




*€»* 



JUDITH ROSALIND GOLD 

Judy 
492 Laurel Street 
/ could talk like that forever. Gilbert 
Masacksic; Orchestra; Band; Library 
Aide; Debating Society — Secretary 4; 
Red Cross; Junior Prom Committee; 
Sport Night. 





GRETA VIRGINIA GUSTAFSON 

109 Cooley Drive 
We are what we create. Oppenheim 
Masacksic; Cycloramists; Junior Prom 
Committee; Drill Team; Sport Night. 



JAMES JOSEPH GOULD, JR. 

Jimmy 

76 Barclay Street 

(Entered Longmeadow January, 

1957) 

/ never met a man I didn't like. Rogers 

Leaders' Club; Traffic Squad; Junior 

Prom Committee; Soccer; Golf; Intra- 

murals. 





PETER W. GUERNSEY 

Pete 
96 Woodside Drive 
There is greatness in everything small. 
Kook 
Cafeteria Aide; Intramurals. 



ELLEN R. GOLDBERG 
Elite 

137 Crestview Circle 
(Entered Longmeadow September, 
1957) 
The woman who understands. Appleton 
Masacksic; Library Aide; Red Cross; 
Junior Achievement Bank; French Club; 
Junior Prom Committee; Sport Night. 





SHARON LYNN HAMMOND 

Sherry 

839 Shaker Road 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1959) 

To be content with what we possess 

the greatest of riches. Cicero 



33 




ROBERT WILLIAM HENSCHKE 

Bob 
179 Burbank Road 
Happy the mortal, free and independent. 
Bunner 

Science Fair Winner — Honorable Men- 
tion 3; "The Matchmaker" — Produc- 
tion. 








ROSEMARY HARTEN 

66 Longfellow Drive 
They're only truly great, who are truly 
good. Chapman 

Red Cross Club; Latin Club; French 
Club; Junior Prom Committee; Sport 
Night. 



:S * m>* 




BARBARA ALLEYNE HINKSON 

Barb 
95 Hawthorne Street 
She who serves best, deserves much. 
Sheldon 

Debating Society; Red Cross Club; Latin 
Club; Junior Prom Committee; Drill 
Team; Sport Night. 



JANE HATHAWAY 

Dwight 
216 Ellington Road 
The social smile, the sympathetic tear. 
Gray 

Masacksic; ]et Jotter; "The Matchmaker" 
— Production; Glee Club; Chorus; Red 
Cross Club; Junior Prom Committee; 
Junior Achievement Bank; Sport Night. 





CAROLINE WILLIAMS HITZ 

Carol 
87 Birchwood Avenue 
Imagination is the eye of the soul. 
Joubert 

Masacksic; "January Thaw" — Produc- 
tion; "The Matchmaker" — Production; 
Cycloramists; Drum Majorette; Junior 
Prom Committee; Sport Night. 



NANCY HILSINGER 

107 Wenonah Road 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1959) 

Great works are performed not by 

strength but by perseverance. Johnson 

Jet Jotter. 



34 





CHARLES ALVA HOLLISTER 

Charlie 
52 Cooky Drive 
Silence is a friend that will never be- 
tray. Confucius 
Soccer; Track; Intramurals. 



RICHARD CLEAVELAND 
HODSKINS 

Hodge 
63 Mill Road 
Never an idle moment. Longfellow 
Photography Club. 





PRUDENCE EVANS HOWARD 

Prue 

165 Western Drive 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1957) 

The smile that wouldn't come off. Wells 

Masacksic; Red Cross Club; Junior Prom 

Committee. 



CHRISTOPHER HOLLAND 

Chris 

67 Greenwich Road 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1958) 

The man who knows. Cole 

Debating Society. 





RICHARD JOEL KAGAN 

Reggie 
20 Edward Circle 
(Entered Longmeadow September, 
1958) 
Always leave them laughing. Cohan 
Masacksic; "The Matchmaker" — Pro- 
duction; Debating Society; Photography 
Club; Latin Club; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; Bowling; Intramurals. 



ERNA MARGARET HOPPE 

18 Arlington Road 
Good taste is the flower of good sense. 
Poincelot 

Masacksic; jet Jotter; Cycloramists; Red 
Cross; Junior Achievement Bank, Sport 
Night. 



35 




MARK KANA 

1215 Longmeadow Street 

To labor rightly and earnestly. Holland 

Traffic Squad; Football; J.V Basketball; 

J.V. Baseball. 





DONA ELIZABETH KEITH 

162 Greenacre Avenue 
It is more blessed to give than to re- 
ceive. The Bible 

Cycloramists; Red Cross Club; Latin 
Club; Sport Night. 



WILLIAM LEWIS KLEMPNER 

Bill 
133 Pleasantview Avenue 
/ am very fond of the company of 
ladies. Johnson 

Essay Contest — Honorable Mention 1 ; 
Masacksic; Jet Jotter — Boys' Sports 
Editor 4, Production and Layout Mana- 
ger 4; Band; Library Aide; Red Cross 
Club; French Club; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; Football; Intramurals. 





RICHARD R. KIMBALL 

Ricky 
114 Englewood Road 
Love is the salt of life. Sheffield 
Leaders' Club; Traffic Squad; Masacksic 
— Business Co-editor 4; Jet Jotter — 
Circulation Manager 4; Band; Red Cross 
Club; Soccer. 





ELIZABETH KATTEN 

Liz 

256 Crestview Circle 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1958) 

Few things are impossible to diligence. 

Johnson 

Masacksic — Secretary 4; Jet Jotter; 
Cafeteria Aide; Junior Achievement 
Bank; French Club — Treasurer 3; Jun- 
ior Prom Committee. 



36 




BARRY KITTREDGE 

505 Laurel Street 
Peace begins just where ambition ends. 
Young 

Chorus; Junior Prom Committee; Foot- 
ball; Basketball; Baseball; Bowling; In- 
tramurals. 



WILLIAM KRIM 

Bill 

32 Wendover Road 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1958) 

A constant friend is rare and hard to 

find. Unknown 

Traffic Squad; Masacksic; ]et Jotter; 
"The Matchmaker" — Cast; Dramatic 
Club; Audio-Visual Aids Club; Debat- 
ing Society — President 4; Junior Prom 
Committee. 





ANNE KATHLEEN LISTNER 

Kathy 

156 Sheffield Avenue 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1957) 

God made a heart of gold. Service 

Junior Prom Committee; Sport Night. 



LINDA RUTH LARKIN 

74 Herbert Street 
Laugh and he well. Green 
Cycloramists; Red Cross Club; Sport 
Night. 





ANDREA PAULA LEERS 

Andy 
48 Englewood Road 
The pursuit of the perfect. Arnold 
National Honor Society 3, 4; Usher for 
Graduating Class of 1959; Masacksic; 
Jet Jotter — Secretary 3, Co-editor 4; 
"The Matchmaker" — Cast; Red Cross 
Club; Latin Club — Secretary 3; French 
Club — Secretary 3; Cheerleader; Sport 
Night. 



KURT R. KROHNE, JR. 

38 Longview Drive 
A man to match the mountain and the 
sea. Markham 

Masacksic; Glee Club; Chorus; Junior 
Prom Committee; Intramurals. 





MARCIA MAYER 

Marsh 
85 Normandy Road 
Note you behave yourself. Truman 
Masacksic; Junior Prom Committee; 
Chorus; Drill Team; Sport Night. 



37 




ANNE FRANCES McCULLOUGH 

56 Belleclaire Avenue 
I'm going to do as I please. Sinatra 
Masacksic; Cycloramists; Red Cross 
Club; Junior Prom Committee; Sport 
Night. 



MICHAEL EDWARD MAZER 

Mike 
The mold of the heart is shown in the 
face. Zohar 

National Honor Society 3, 4; Usher for 
Graduating Class of 1959; Science Fair 
— 3rd Prize 2; Boys' State 3; Leaders' 
Club; Traffic Squad; Masacksic — Treas- 
urer 4; Jet Jotter; "Our Town" — Cast; 
"January Thaw" — Cast; "The Match- 
maker" — Cast; Dramatic Club; Glee 
Club; French Club — President 3, 4; 
Soccer; Track; Intramurals. 





THEODORE P. MILTON 

Ted 
91 Lincoln Road 
He who keeps silence reaps. Italian 
Proverb 
Track; Intramurals. 



MARY THERESA McCORMACK 

Terry 
19 Greenacre Avenue 
My heart lifted my feet, and I danced. 
Nathan 

Masacksic; Cycloramists; Red Cross — 
Treasurer 3; Latin Club; Junior Prom 
Committee; Cheerleader — Co-captain 3; 
Sport Night. 





ANDREW MORACE, JR. 

Andy 
140 Barrington Road 
Strength is a man's charm. Ellis 
Football; J.V. Basketball. 



JO ANNE MILLER 
Jonnie 
124 Dover Road 
Life is too short to be serious. Anony- 
mous 

Essay Contest — Honorable Mention 3; 
Masacksic; Jet Jotter; Cycloramists; Glee 
Club; Chorus; Cafeteria Aide; Junior 
Prom Committee; Sport Night. 



38 





RICHARD MURPHY 

Murph 
53 Forest Glen Road 
(Entered Longmeadow November, 
1956) 
For where there are Irish, there's loving 
and fighting. Kipling 
Junior Prom Chairman; Leaders' Club; 
Traffic Squad; Cycloramists; Glee Club; 
Latin Club; Football; Basketball; Base- 
ball; Intramurals. 



TAD P. MORAN 

20 East Greenwich Road 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1957) 

Look the world straight in the face. 

Keller 

Junior Prom Committee; Football; In- 
tramurals. 





LINDA DOROTHY NORTON 

151 Bliss Road 
A silence that speaks more clearly than 
words. Philo 

Cafeteria Aide; Junior Prom Commit- 
tee; Sport Night. 



SANDRA ANN MOUNT 

Sandie 
73 Bliss Road 
Gentle words, quiet words, are powerful 
words. Gladden 

Chorus; Junior Prom Committee; Sport 
Night. 





SALLY ANN NEEF 

133 Longmeadow Street 
Art for art's sake. Coussin 
Essay Contest — Honorable Mention 3; 
Masacksic — Art Editor 4; Jet Jotter; 
Cycloramists; Junior Prom Committee. 



39 



ROBERT DOUGLAS NYE 

Bob 
78 Pleasantview Avenue 
There are palaces that open only to 
music. Zohar 

Class Vice-President 1, 2; Traffic Squad; 
Masacksic; Jet Jotter; "Our Town" — 
Cast; "The Matchmaker" — Cast; Dra- 
matic Club; Lyrics; Glee Club — Presi- 
dent 4; Orchestra; Dance Band; Cafe- 
teria Aide; Red Cross Club; Latin Club; 
French Club; Junior Prom Committee; 
Intramurals. 




MICHAEL JOSEPH O'MALLEY 

Mike 

290 Farmington Road 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1957) 

Boys will be boys. Hubbard 

Leaders' Club; Traffic Squad; Jet Jotter; 

Junior Prom Committee; Football; J.V. 

Basketball. 





MICHAEL L. PARKER 

Mike 

306 Ellington Road 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1957) 

My theory is to enjoy life. Lamb 

Boys' State Alternate; Bowling; Intra- 

murals. 



CAROLYN WILSON PAIGE 



192 Greenacre Avenue 
Lead me to a rock that is too high for 
me. The Bible 

National Honor Society 3, 4; Usher 
for Graduating Class of 1959; Essay 
Contest — Honorable Mention 1 ; Stu- 
dent Council; Class President 1; Lead- 
ers' Club; Masacksic — Literary Editor 
4; Jet Jotter; A.I.C. Model Congress; 
Band; French Club; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; Jet Team Captain; Drill Team; 
Sport Night. 





JAMES C. PAGE 

Jimmy 
26 Westmoreland Avenue 
Little man, what now? Fallada 
National Honor Society 4; Traffic Squad; 
Junior Prom Committee; Intramurals; 
Rensselaer Elementary Algebra Prize. 



MICHAEL STEPHEN PALMER 

Mike 

24 Caravelle Drive 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1958) 

7 will maintain the humor to the last. 

Cowley 

Essay Contest — Honorable Mention 3; 
Masacksic; Jet Jotter — Feature Editor 
4; "The Matchmaker" — Cast; Dramatic 
Club; Latin Club; Soccer; J.V. Basket- 
ball; Intramurals. 



40 





PATRICIA ANN PENNEY 

Fat 

66 Westmoreland Avenue 

No mischief but a woman is at the end 

of it. Shakespeare 

Masacksic; Jet Jotter; Glee Club; Junior 
Prom Committee; Cheerleader; Drill 
Team; Sport Night. 







DEBORAH PRATT 

Debbie 
857 Longmeadow Street 
He who is charitable and just fills the 
world with kindness. Eleazar 
Lyrics; Glee Club; Latin Club; French 
Club; Sport Night. 





SAMUEL JAY RICKLESS 

Sonny 
127 Magnolia Circle 
Life is a jest and all things show it. Gay 
Traffic Squad; Red Cross Club; Business 
Club; Junior Achievement Bank; Bowl- 
ing; Intramurals. 



RAVEN C. REED 

Tiger 

224 Longmeadow Street 

(Entered Longmeadow November, 

1956) 

Some think the world is made for fun 

and frolic, and so do 1. Anonymous 

Jet ] otter; Glee Club; Junior Prom 

Committee; Sport Night. 





EILEEN REILLY 
Ei 

1650 Longmeadow Street 
To study hard, think quietly, and act 
frankly,, Channing 

Masacksic; ]et jotter; Cycloramists; Glee 
Club; Cafeteria Aide; Red Cross Club; 
Junior Prom Committee; Sport Night. 



DOUGLAS RANSOM 
Doug 
11 Woodlawn Place 
And ever lived on earth content. Brown- 
ing 
Intramurals. 





DENNIS MICHAEL ROBB 

Denny 
26 Riverview Avenue 
Good nature and good sense must ever 
join. Pope 

Leaders' Club; Traffic Squad — Captain 
4; Glee Club; Cafeteria Aide; Football 
— Captain 4; Baseball; Intramurals. 



41 




NATHALIE ELEANOR ROSE 

Lee 
305 Maple Road 
A heart without a care. Unknown 
Masacksic; Cycloramists; Glee Club; Red 
Cross; Sport Night. 



STEPHEN ARTHUR SHATZ 

Steve 
30 Colony Acres Road 
The secret of success is constancy to pur- 
pose. Disraeli 

National Honor Society 3, 4; Usher for 
Graduating Class of 1959; Science Fair 
— 3rd Prize 2; Student Council; Lead- 
ers' Club; Traffic Squad — Captain 4; 
Masacksic — Co-Editor 3, Editor 4; Jet 
Jotter; "Our Town" — Cast; "January 
Thaw" — Cast; Dramatic Club; Cafeteria 
Aide; Latin Club; Junior Prom Commit- 
tee; J.V. Soccer; Intramurals. 





ELIZABETH ANN SHEPARD 

Betsy 
133 Field Road 
In quietness and confidence shall be 
your strength. The Bible 
National Honor Society 4; Masacksic; 
Lyrics; Glee Club; Orchestra; Band; 
Cafeteria Aide; French Club; Sport 
Night. 



PETER JOHN ROUTSON 

Pete 
44 Elmwood Avenue 
Everything is sweetened by risk. Smith 
Hockey; Tennis; Intramurals. 





SARA KENNISON SHAW 

1596 Longmeadow Street 
Of manners, gentle, of affections, mild. 
Pope 

Leaders' Club — Secretary-Treasurer 4; 
Masacksic; Cycloramists; Lyrics; Glee 
Club; Cafeteria Aide — Manager 4; Jun- 
ior Prom Committee; Cheerleader; Drill 
Team; Sport Night. 



42 



GLENN WILLIAM SNYDER 

Snip 
117 Lincoln Road 
To love the game beyond the prize. 
Newbolt 

Cycloramists; Glee Club; Band; Cafe- 
teria Aide; Junior Prom Committee; 
Football; Basketball; Baseball; Intramu- 
rals. 





PETER WILLIAM STROPLE 

Little Rock 
33 Farm lea Road 
Great deeds need no trumpets. Bailey 
Usher for Graduating Class of 1959; 
Williams College Book Award; Essay 
Contest — Honorable Mention 1, 3; 
Student Council — Treasurer 3, Vice- 
President 4; Class President 2; Class 
Vice-Presidefit 3; Traffic Squad; Masack- 
sic; "Our Town" — Cast; Cafeteria 
Aide; Junior Prom Committee; J.V. 
Basketball; J.V. Baseball. 



DOROTHY LOUISE SUNTER 

Dottie 
109 Dover Road 

this, too, is a virtue; to be happy. 
Boeme 

Mixed Chorus; Junior Prom Commit- 
tee; Sport Night. 





KENT ROGER TALBOT 

387 Williams Street 
(Re-entered Longmeadow September, 
1959) 
Live lor today! Keble 
Hockey; Tennis; Intramurals. 



ROBERT H. SUMMERSGILL 

Bob 
19 Dover Road 
There are some people who are very 
resourceful. Nash 

National Honor Society 4 — Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; Essay Contest — Honorable 
Mention 4; Traffic Squad; Masacksic, 
]et Jotter — Special Sections Editor 4 
Debating Society; Photography Club 
French Club; Junior Prom Committee 
Hockey; Track; Intramurals. 





H. ELSA TenBroeck 

70 Warren Terrace 
The highest wisdom is kindness. Proverb 
Lyrics; Glee Club; Orchestra; Band; 
Sport Night. 



ELEANOR M. SWAIN 

152 Massachusetts Avenue 
Girls have curious minds. Browning 
National Honor Society 4; Usher for 
Graduating Class of 1959; Essay Contest 
— Honorable Mention 4; Cycloramists; 
Lyrics; Glee Club; Orchestra — Histo- 
rian 4; Band; Cafeteria Aide; Latin 
Club; French Club; Drill Team; Sport 
Night. 

43 




GARY TINCKNELL 

32 Lincoln Road 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1958) 

Natural curiosity, the mother of science. 

Singer 

Orchestra; Dance Band; Band. 





MARY ANN TWOHIG 

Mar 
36 Nevins Avenue 
Toujours gate! Marquand 
Glee Club; Chorus; Cafeteria Aide; Red 
Cross Club; Junior Prom Committee; 
Sport Night. 




PATRICIA FENN TRUMBULL 

Pat 

79 Birchwood Avenue 
Woman's at best a contradiction. Pope 
Masacksic; Glee Club; Chorus; Red 
Cross Club; French Club; Junior Prom 
Committee; Sport Night. 





JAMES DONALD TUFTS 
Jim 

16 Meadowbrook Road 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1957) 

Oh boys, the times I've seen. Gogarty 

Junior Prom Committee; Soccer; 

Hockey; Intramurals. 



WILLIAM E. TONER, JR. 

Bill 
130 Westmoreland Avenue 
He was a friend, faithful, and just. 
Caesar 

Glee Club; Audio-Visual Aids Club; 
Junior Prom Committee; Hockey; 
Track; Intramurals. 



44 





TIMOTHY M. VIGNONE 

Tim 
124 Homestead Boulevard 
The heart's intention is the measure of 
all things. Maimonides 
Cycloramists; Glee Club; Audio-Visual 
Aids Club; Cafeteria Aide; Debating 
Society; Junior Prom Committee; Intra- 
murals. 



DAVID L. VINCE 

Dave 

61 Wilken Drive 

(Entered Longmeadow September, 

1958) 

I'm one of the few people in the world 

without worries. Snite 





CAROL JEAN WHITEHEAD 
64 Pleasantview Avenue 
(Entered Longmeadow January, 
1957) 
A kind and gentle heart she has. Gold- 
smith 

Jet Jotter; Lyrics; Glee Club; French 
Club; Sport Night. 



MARILYN LEE WEISMAN 

Bunny 

\Al Wheelmeadow Drive 

To the woman, the heart is her world. 

Grabbe 

Glee Club; Chorus; Cafeteria Aide; Red 
Cross; Junior Prom Committee; Sport 
Night. 





ALICE ELIZABETH WHITE 

Al 

171 Homestead Boulevard 
He is good that does good to others. 
La Bruyere 

Library Aide; Business Club — Secretary 
4; French Club. 



KAREN ELIZABETH WEIDNER 

214 Converse Street 
The good obtained by effort is twice as 
precious. Saadio 

Essay Contest — Honorable Mention 1; 
Masacksic; Cydoramists; Chorus; Cafe- 
teria Aide; Red Cross Club; Junior 
Prom Committee; Sport Night. 






JAY MADISON WILEY 

498 Converse Street 
Say little, and do much. Shammai 
Science Fair — Honorable Mention 1; 
Traffic Squad; Masacksic; Jet Jotter — 
Interview Editor 4; Cafeteria Aide; 
Audio Visual Aids Club; Debating 
Club; French Club; Football — Manager 
3; Hockey — Manager 2, 3; Intramu- 
rals. 



45 




LINDA JEAN WRIGHT 

Lin 
325 Williams Street 
Women are ever in extremes. La Bruy- 
ere 

Essay Contest — Honorable Mention 3; 
Masacksic — Co-editor of Patrons and 
Patronesses 4; Junior Prom Committee; 
Drill Team; Sport Night. 




v z 



ALFRED L. WOOD, JR. 

Al 
94 Mill Road 
To question all things. Mill 
Traffic Squad; Glee Club; Photography 

Club. 





EDWARD ZINN 

Ed 

62 Birch Road 

(Entered Longmeadow February, 

1959) 

Give a man opportunity and he will 

grow. Brandeis 

National Honor Society 4; Traffic Squad; 
Intramurals. 



JOSEPH A. DUVAL 

Midget 
11 Massachusetts Avenue 
He was a mighty fellow. Unknown 
Traffic Squad; "The Matchmaker" — 
Production; Audio-Visual Aids Club; 
Business Club; Intramurals. 





46 



CLASS HISTRIONICS 

Cast of characters: The Members of the Class of I960 
Produced by: Longmeadow High School 
Directed by: Miss Maclntyre, Mr. Pratt, and Mr. 

Climo 
Time: The Late 1950's 
Setting: The Town of Longmeadow 

Lights — Camera — Action! 

( curtain rises ) 

ACT I: 

As the last few weeks of summer vacation flew by, we, the freshmen of 1956, ready 
to make our high school debut, experienced an acute case of stage fright. We entered 
LHS with shaking knees and confused wits, and our first efforts at adjustments drew un- 
rehearsed laughter from the upperclassmen. Nevertheless, we soon became accustomed to 
the bright lights and the numerous activities of our new high school setting. 

Behind the scenes, our newly elected officers, Carolyn Paige, the industrious presi- 
dent; Bob Nye, vice-president; Sue Thomas, secretary; and Joan Mohrman, treasurer, 
worked feverishly to get us organized. 

In those days life was hectic! Aside from our academic studies, we attended mock 
presidential elections, a jazz assembly, and the school's first sock hop. Remember? Sport 
critics raved about our first football team's success in its opening performance. When we 
weren't cheering our teams, the freshmen boys and girls strongh/ supported intramurals. 

Just as we were beginning to get settled, our routine was interrupted by a revolt in 
the lunchroom (with a participating cast of hundreds). Strange to say the subsequent 
lunches showed no marked improvement. 

Tragedy struck with our first midyears, but somehow we managed to pull through. In 
another academic field, Doug Ellis distinguished himself by winning the Freshman Essay 
Contest. But All work and no play was not our motto. This was proven by the success 
(not financial) of our freshman dance — Mardi Gras — and our enthusiasm as slaves at 
the original Latin Banquet. 

One of the highlights of that year was the presentation of Thornton Wilder's 
Our Town, in which our classmates Bill Adams, Joan Bloom, Mike Mazer, Bob Nye, and 
Steve Shatz all trod the boards. The June Awards Assembly finally arrived, recognizing 
others of us: Jim Page, who won a math prize, and Marcia Clark, who won an art award. 

With a little less confusion and a bit more self-confidence, we pulled through, and 
thus ended a harassed, but happy year for the stage struck freshmen. 

ACT II: 

Without much prompting, we returned to school in the fall of 1957, eager to assume 
our new position as sophomores. We were no longer the lowly freshmen! You might 
say we became "understudies" to the upperclassmen. Anxious to join their league (the 
Ivy League, of course), we invaded LHS with buckles in the back of everything, Shetland 
sweaters, all shades of the rainbow, and really collegiate blacks and whites. 

Our first duty was to stage class elections; Peter Strople became our new president, 
Bob Nye again assumed the vice-presidency, and Sue Thomas and Joan Mohrman re- 
turned to their positions as secretary and treasurer. Once more, our class dance, this year 
The Big Apple, failed to get a full house, but otherwise was very "fruitful." 

In the limelight of boys' sports was Glen Snyder, who, as Daily News Star of the 
Week, supported the basketball team during a successful season. The girls shared the stage, 
featuring Terry McCormack's modern dance solo in Girls' Sport Night and Carolyn 
Paige's New England A.A.U. award for performance on the uneven parallel bars. 

Our schedule was once more interrupted — this time by a melodramatic bomb scare. 
We found ourselves with an unexpected free Wednesday afternoon, but who can ever 
forget school the next Saturday? Our whole day was "kilt." 

The Dramatic Club held the audience captive with its production of January Thaw, 
featuring our classmates Joan Bloom, Mike Mazer, and Steve Shatz. In the April Music 
Assembly, Bob Nye showed his talent in a solo at the piano. 



47 



When the curtain fell on our final awards assembly, honoring Steve Shatz and Mike 
Mazer with third prize in the Science Fair, we could hardly believe that another year had 
passed. But, with considerable rehearsal behind us, we were now ready to face the rigors of 
the junior year with confidence and enthusiasm. 

On from the amateur theater to Broadway! 

ACT III: 

During the summer intermission, the stage crew for the new wing and gym worked 
feverishly to finish. Unfortunately, the curtain for the junior year rose before they put 
on the finishing touches. But the play must go on — so we worked in our concrete cells 
at S.T.P. with only nature's light. 

These inconveniences soon became part of the scenery for this was the year of 
advanced courses! We'll never forget the endless hours of "outside reading," work, work 
and more work for Mr. Z., and Mr. Lopes' subtle (?) humor ( ? ) . 

Now playing "supporting roles," we juniors chose "Mac" MacDonnell as president, 
Charlie Brown (more commonly known as "Little Rock" Strople) as V.P., and again 
those favorites at the polls, Sue Thomas, secretary, and Joan Mohrman, treasurer. 

On the sports scene our football team went undefeated. Then with the advent of 
the winter months, we followed our teams to victory all over the state — to Amherst, 
where the basketball team reached the finals in the Small Schools Tournament; and to 
Boston, where the hockey team, after winning the Suburban Division, competed in the 
play-offs. As the boys gained victory after victory, the girls gained pound after pound 
in the absence of a gym teacher and program (Miss Kelsey to the rescue! ). 

This was a year of academic firsts. The Freshman Essay Contest took a curtain call 
in our junior year with Bruce Aldrich receiving top billing. Then, too, we juniors played 
a leading role in the establishment of the Honor Study Hall and the French and Latin 
Clubs. Looking ahead, several girls made use of the experimental Early Application Plan 
by applying to college in their junior year. 

And a lunchroom revolt once more made its appearance! Innovations in the pay- 
ment and disposal procedures met with dramatic protest as we found our pockets weighed 
down with pennies and quarters and our hands full of dirty dishes. 

We weren't too busy, though, to make a comeback in the social world and "good 
old wishy-washy Charlie Brown" became the biggest box office attraction in our dance 
history. At last our profit wasn't just "Peanuts"! 

Once again that great humorist ( ? ) , Mr. Lopes ( who teaches English on the side ) 
directed a smashing hit this year, The Matchmaker, with Joan Bloom in the title role 
and Mike Palmer playing opposite her. The supporting cast included such junior cele- 
brities as Ginny Dow, Mike Mazer, Bill Krim, Bob Nye, and Dave DuBuisson. 

Also on stage that year was our first Student Council Funday. Headlining the pro- 
gram were Bob MacDonnell, the madras-clad M.C.; Dick Murphy (The ALL-/ erican 
Boy); and numerous, humorous skits by both students and faculty. 

In May, we junior sophisticates took a trip to Holland for our Prom. Decorations 
by Leers (tons of tulips), and music by Ravosa made the evening a perfect one. The 
prom chairman, Dick Murphy (The ALL- American Boy) crowned Bob MacDonnell 
and Sue Thomas king and queen. 

But we did have our serious moments which earned us distinction. Marcia Clark 
was a co-winner of the third prize in the Science Fair and Brian Doherty won both 
fourth prize and the Hampden Medical Award. Receiving book awards at the final 
assembly were Elliot Bloom, the Harvard award; Bob MacDonnell, the Dartmouth award; 
and Peter Strople, the Williams award. Joan Bloom was chosen as Governor's Aide, and 
Ginny Dow, Bill Krim, and Mike Mazer were selected to represent us at Girls' and 
Boys' State. 

Ginny and Bob were again honored, this time as marshals of the Class of 1959 at 
graduation. Roused from the comfortable security of our junior year, we suddenly came 
to the frightening realization that this graduation was our dress rehearsal. We, too, 
would be marching down this same aisle in one short year. 

ACT IV: 

Seniors at last! As the curtain finally rose on our fourth act, we, the Class of I960, 
assumed "leading roles" at LHS. From the start an affable Italian, Guido Zuffellato, stole 
the show during his short stay with the senior class at Longmeadow. Included in our 



48 



audience now were three years of underclassmen plus living proof that size is inversely 
proportional to volume of noise (the seventh grade outcasts, of course). 

An already experienced senior, Bill Cox, became our president; Mac, vice-president; 
and playing their perennial roles as secretary and treasurer were Sue Thomas and Joan 
Mohrman. In the Student Council Mac and Peter Strople (sound familiar?) became 
president and V.P. respectively. Under their leadership, the Student Council sponsored 
several foreign travel assemblies. The Debate-Discussion Club, too, turned theatrical as 
they presented their "Plan A" skit. 

Leading stars in the fall sports spotlight were Pioneer Valley soccer players Skip 
Baird and Mike Palmer; and the co-captains of the football team, Dennie Robb and Bob 
MacDonnell. But even our tremendous team and school spirit failed to bring a happy 
ending to the "Classical tragedy." Senior girls also took title roles in sports as Barbara 
Chapin became captain of the Drill Team and Ginny Dow called for a peppy show of 
spirit with the cheerleaders. In addition, Carolyn Paige and Eline Dierauf kept up the 
Jet and White rivalry in their respective teams. Off to an excellent start, the winter sports 
starred many seniors. Among them were Dick Murphy (The ALL-American Boy) and 
Glen Snyder in basketball and Skip Baird in hockey. 

Meanwhile "Zombie Jamboree," "Scotch and Soda," and "They're Rioting in Africa," 
all rang through the halls as the Kingston Trio became the mania of all the seniors and 
the "hungary intellectuals" at LHS. The seniors, their original backers, "were lucky 
enough to run into them down there" when the K Trio came to Springfield. Need we 
say more? 

Now we "slipped into the relative security" of our senior routine. Although we were 
constantly confronted by the problem of college and applications, we managed to keep 
up with current obligations as well as future plans. High on the list of senior activities 
was the Honor Society headlining Elliot Bloom as president and Bob Summersgill, vice- 
president. Included in this group's repertoire were the new tutoring system, the annual 
alumni tea, and the lucrative, but omnipresent task of coat-checking. 

As seniors we took the top hand in producing the "Playbill'' of the high school world 
— our own Jet ]otter. Co-editors Andrea Leers and Ginny Dow worked on perfecting the 
form and quality of our recently printed newspaper. Joan Bloom, as assistant editor and 
general news editor; Bill Klempner, production manager and boys' sports editor; Dave 
DuBuisson, business manager; Bob Summersgill, special sections editor; Mike Palmer, 
feature editor; Jay Wiley, interview editor; Ricky Kimball, circulation manager; and 
Barbara Chapin, girls' sports editor; all put time and effort into making a "good show." 
As might be expected, the staff had its ups and downs, with the feature writers continu- 
ally threatening to resign, everyone trying to make deadlines, and complaints from the 
sports section whose style was cramped by THE ROBINSON AD. But all in all, the 
Jet Jo ft er enjoyed a successful run at LHS. 

But hard work was accompanied by our own divertissements as we discovered new 
comedians in the frequent class book meetings. The informal gatherings (co-sponsored 
by the yearbook and the newspaper) were infamous not only for producing the Class 
Will and Caricatures (half of which was censored) but also for serving as the school 
grapevine. 

Then, too, through the combined efforts of the Masacksic and the Jet Jotter, an ex- 
tension to the library was opened in the SA. room for these strictly "U" people, much 
to Miss Baird's frustration. 

The Masacksic, another exclusive senior feature, put many members of our class 
before the footlights. Directed by the ambitious and competent Steve Shatz, yearbook 
progress was off to an early start. Thanks to the able assistance of Carolyn Paige and her 
literary staff, Bill Adams and Ricky Kimball and their enormous business staff, Sally 
Neef's endless toil in the art room, Elliot Bloom's "clicking," and of course Barbara 
Chapin and Doug Ellis with "high pressure salesmanship," the I960 Masacksic promised 
to be spectacular. Now, due to the yearbook deadlines, we must end our review of "Class 
Histrionics before this play is finished. 

Looking back at our high career — our "stage-struck" freshman days, the trials of 
the sophomore "understudy" year, our "supporting roles" as juniors, and finally our senior 
"leads" — we see the progress that we've made. We have both benefited from a fine edu- 
cation and contributed precedents to the school. But we know the rehearsal does not end 
at graduation. We're all "hams" at heart, and for us, All the world's a Stage. 



49 



CLASS BALLOT 

Most popular boy: Bob MacDonnell 

Most popular girl: Sue Thomas 

Boy most likely to succeed: Steve Shatz 

Girl most likely to succeed : Ginny Dow 

Most athletic boy: Glen Snyder 

Most athletic girl : Carolyn Paige 

Class scholar — boy: Elliot Bloom 

Class scholar — girl: Andrea Leers 

Boy who has done most for the school: Bob MacDonnell 

Girl who has done most for the school : Ginny Dow 

Most talented boy : Bob Nye 

Most talented girl : Terry McCormack 

Class wit — boy : Doug Ellis 

Class wit — girl: Sandy Albano 

Best looking boy : Doc Cort 

Best looking girl: Sue Thomas 

Class flirt — - boy: Bill Adams 

Class flirt — girl: Pat Penney 

Best dressed boy : Bill Cox 

Best dressed girl : Joan Bloom 

Class chums — boys: Doug Ellis and Dave DuBuisson 

Class chums — girls : Pat Penney and Marcia Mayer 

Teachers' delight: Andrea Leers 

Teachers' despair: John Baldwin 

Class optimists: Peter Strople and Alex Arnold 

Class pessimist: Sally Neef 

Class record album : "Kingston Trio at the Hungry i" 

Class lunch: "Sloppy Joes" 

Class book : You're reading it! 




50 



CAN YOU IMAGINE . . . 

Sally Neef not worrying? 

Judy Gold not talking? 

Richard Kagan hating girls? 

Sarah Caswell in a Model T? 

Steve Shatz not being cynical? 

Mr. Haskell talking in "glittering generalities"? 

A quiet library? 

Connie Gavin being on time? 

Peter Strople with an empty car? 

Bill Craft driving on the street? 

A lunch that everyone likes? 

LHS without the Class of I960? 

Doug Ellis not buying a yearbook? 

Jimmy Page getting a "B" in math? 

Ed Zinn getting home early from the Junior Prom? 

Joan Bloom fighting with Mr. Lopes? 

Dick Murphy going to 4th lunch? 

Mike Palmer working for the telephone company? 

A serious Class Book Committee meeting? 

Loring Studios giving you what you want? 

Mike Palmer being a jockey? 

Bill Toner playing pro hockey? 

Betsy Shepard hating baseball? 

Mike Cimini being a Yugoslav? 

Ken Clark explaining a math problem so that it can be understood? 

Sue Thomas not being Class Secretary? 

Elliot Bloom driving below the speed limit? 

Peter Guernsey being a heavy-weight boxer? 

Glenn Snyder warming the bench? 

Elsa TenBroeck silent? 

Al Wood without an idea? 

Traffic officers getting at the end of the lunch line? 

The seventh graders quiet? 

Our class denouncing the Kingston Trio? 

The senior girls riding bicycles to school? 

Mr. Lopes praising the school lunches? 



51 



■ 



CLASS CARICATURES 



Always 



Carol Abrams 
Dave Adams 
Bill Adams 
Sandy Albano 
Bruce Aldrich 
Caroline Almgren 
Alex Arnold 
Tom Astaldi 
Skip Baird 
John Baldwin 
Barbara Biondi 
Beverly Biondi 
Elliot Bloom 
Joan Bloom 
Carol Boltrucyk 
Donna Breglio 
Bob Bullions 
Lynne Casal 
Sarah Caswell 
Barbara Chapin 
Dave Christensen 
Mike Cimini 
Charlie Clark 
Ken Clark 
Marcia Clark 
Judy Cohen 
Ginny Cook 
Doc Cort 
Marie Coulomb 
Bill Cox 
Bill Craft 
Bill Craig 
Mike DeVylder 
Eliane Dierauf 
Brian Doherty 
Ginny Dow 
Peggy Doyle 
Dave DuBuisson 
Doug Ellis 
Ed Flagler 
Duncan Fordyce 



arguing 

walking 

borrowing money 

giggling 

running 

sophisticated 

without a license 

defending Chevrolets 

frank 

casual 

confusing 

confusing 

witty 

busy 

absent 

gossiping 

a cube 

doodling 

late 

mad 

saying, "That's nothing'.' 

getting ribbed about Italy 

diddly-hoozing 

at odds 

pinned 

pleasant 

cheerful 

sleeping 

complaining 

smiling 

procrastinating 

a Dartmouth man 

scuffing his feet 

in the gym 

the "Flash" 

cheering 

reading 

esoteric 

ivy league 

quick to grasp 

hanging effigies 



Will be 

a poet 

a mailman 

a bachelor 

a history teacher 

an English teacher 

a kindergarten teacher 

a law officer 

a cavalier 

a public relations man 

a rabbit raiser 

a secretary 

a stenographer 

a statistic 

a foreign news correspondent 

a car-hop 

a lovelorn columnist 

an engineer 

a painter 

a globetrotter 

a debutante 

a barber 

a pizza king 

a farmer 

a wrestler 

an artist 

a housewife 

a publisher 

a judge 

a good-will ambassador 

a cop 

a major league pitcher 

a company president 

a disc jockey 

a nurse 

an admiral 

a success 

an opera singer 

on Madison Ave. 

the life of a party 

a mountain climber 

a photographer 



Remembered by or for 

her teachers 

being late for school 

his uncle 

her T-bird 

his trombone 

Doug 

his crazy hat 

his friendliness 

the Scotch 

his hare 

the armed forces 

her forgetfullness 

his wisdom 

Mr. Lopes 

the state line 

Mr. Shindler 

his haircut 

her bright sweaters 

her horse 

a Swiss waiter 

his allergies 

his homeroom 

the other team 

his teachers 

her hairdos 

her absences 

her cigars 

his good looks 

her wit 

his leadership 

his driving 

J.A. 

the "Hound" 

her German sneakers 

his slide rule 

her pep 

her novels 

his glasses 

Keeg 

the soccer team 

his girl friends 



52 



CLASS CARICATURES 

Always Will be 



Connie Gavin 
Elsie Gilmour 
Judy Gold 
Ellie Goldberg 
Jimmy Gould 
Peter Guernsey 
Greta Gustafson 
Sharon Hammond 
Rosemary Harten 
Jane Hathaway 
Bob Henschlce 
Nancy Hilsinger 
Barbara Hinkson 
Carol Hitz 
Richard Hodskins 
Chris Holland 
Charles Hollister 
Erna Hoppe 
Prue Howard 
Richard Kagan 
Mark Kana 
Liz Katten 
Donna Keith 
Kurt Krohne 
Rick Kimball 
Bill Klempner 
Bill Krim 
Linda Larkin 
Andrea Leers 
Kathy Listner 
Bob MacDonnell 
Marcia Mayer 
Mike Mazer 
Terry McCormack 
Joanne Miller 
Joan Mohrman 
Ted Milton 
Andy Morace 
Tad Moran 
Sandra Mount 
Dick Murphy 



soft-spoken 

reticent 

talking 

with Phil 

friendly 

listening to foreign radio stations 

sewing 

reminiscing 

dreaming 

flirting 

complaining 

studying chemistry 

studying 

in the art room 

cracking knuckles 

a play-boy 

smiling 

with the boys 

naive 

around 

quiet 

working hard 

taking RDX pills 

skiing 

conning 

saying, "You've got chances'.' 

ambiguous 

silly 

first in the class 

sensitive 

a leader 

saying, "I can't see." 

teasing 

graceful 

out 

in a hurry 

in homeroom 

in business 

quiet 

being teased 

embarrassed 



a decorator 

a stenographer 

a tennis player 

married 

a businessman 

a jeweler 

a fashion designer 

a farmer's wife 

a writer 

wife of a baseball player 

a mechanic 

a U. N. Representative 

an acrobat 

an interior decorator 

a safecracker 

a turkey farmer 

a custom body designer 

a marriage counselor 

a midshipman 

a beach ball manufacturer 

making starch 

a businesswoman 

a dietitian 

an Olympic star 

a private eye 

a professor 

a sports announcer 

independent 

an idealist 

in public relations 

a politician 

a major 

a giant among small men 

a ballet star 

mother of 7 boys 

a scientist 

a car salesman 

a short order cook 

a barker 

happy 

a monk 



Remembered by or for 

her tardiness 

her quietness 

her complaints 

her diamond 

his low golf scores 

his coin collection 

Mrs. Blakeborough 

her sweetness 

her blonde hair 

everyone 

his car 

her madras dresses 

her silent crushes 

her frankness 

Al and Bruce 

his pool table 

his solitude 

Dartmouth 

the Admiral 

his good sense of humor 

his perseverance 

early acceptance 

her green "animal" 

his car 

the girls 

the junior girls 

his mashed cigar 

her moods 

the car pool 

her honesty 

Sally 

her ring 

Carole Reed 

her friendliness 

her mischief 

her ponytail 

his car 

Frenchie 

you know who 

SAM 

his temper 



53 



CLASS CARICATURES 



Sally Neef 
Linda Norton 
Bob Nye 
Mike O'Malley 
Jimmy Page 
Carolyn Paige 
Mike Palmer 
Mike Parker 
Pat Penny 
Debby Pratt 
Doug Random 
Raven Reed 
Eileen Reilly 
Sam Rickless 
Lee Rose 
Denny Robb 
Peter Routson 
Steve Shatz 
Sarah Shaw 
Betsy Shepard 
Glenn Snyder 
Peter Strople 
Bob Summersgill 
Dotty Sunter 
Eleanor Swain 
Kent Talbot 
Elsa TenBroeck 

Sue Thomas 
Gary Tincknell 
Bill Toner 
Pat Trumbull 
Jim Tufts 
Mary Ann Twohig 
Tim Vignone 
Dave Vince 



Always 

drawing 

shouting 

worried 

with the boys 

talking about his marks 

involved 

making puns 

active 

flirting 

quiet 

wide-eyed 

conning 

sober 

getting excited 

writing letters 

friendly 

blowing his cow horn 

out of homeroom 

cashiering 

cynical 

"Red" 

"Rock" 

good natured 

with Sara 

chattering 

talking about cars 

saying, "Wicked" 

class secretary 

reading science books 

missing the punch line 

gossiping 

wiggling his ears 

worrying 

funny 

carefree 



Will be 

a gym teacher 

a receptionist 

a piano tuner 

a bookie 

a "Y" instructor 

first woman president 

polka bandleader 

a forest ranger 

a chauffeur 

a nurse 

a kidnapper 

an actress 

a cashier 

a salesman 

a florist 

a subterranean engineer 

a big man 

a professional student 

a social worker 

owner of a baseball team 

a pro athlete 

a taxi driver 

ambassador to France 

a druggist 

a flutist 

a racer 

a matchmaker 

a stewardess 

a chemist 

a clerk 

another Abby 

successful 

a social worker 

a politician 

a lifeguard 



Remembered, by or for 

Miss Erickson 

her long hair 

his music 

detention 

his string ties 

her skiing 

his gym bag 

his curly hair 

the Junior Class President 

her French 

Mr. Finklehoffe 

A. I .C. Fraternities 

her mascara 

Mr. Shindler 

her home permanents 

his fans 

several girls 

his peach brandy 

her cheerleading 

Elvis Presley 

his red goatee 

Charlie Brown 

his non-logical statements 

the blue MG 

her curiosity 

his white convertible 

her school spirit 

grabbing someone's arm 

his picture at Loring's 

his jailbird sweaters 

West Point 

painting his car 

her problems 

the boys 

his homeroom 



Karen Weidner 


chewing gum 


a TV announcer 


Channel 22 


Bunny Weisman 


faithful 


a model 


J.B. 


Alice White 


rushing 


a librarian 


Miss Baird 


Carol Whitehead 


helpful 


a music teacher 


her monkey pocketbook 


Jay Wiley 


interviewing 


a scientist 


his twin sisters 


Linda Wright 


neatly dressed 


a socialite 


the Yearbook patrons 


Al Wood 


reading science fiction 


a philosopher 


his beat poetry 


Ed Zinn 


teasing Elsa 


a top salesman 


his accent 






54 





Last Will and Testament 
of the Class of I960 

We, the class of I960, being of purged minds and heavenly bodies, do hereby de- 
clare this to be our last will and testament and bequeath the following: 

Elliot Bloom leaves his traffic tickets to Bill Sproul. 

Jim Tufts leaves his field hockey stick to Miss Kelsey. 

Al Wood leaves a plan to overthrow the government to Roger Swain. 

Chris Holland leaves his European address book to Bill Coes. 

Dennie Robb leaves his badge to some other dedicated fuzz. 

Linda Wright leaves the "wright" way. 

Dick Murphy leaves his "All-American Boy" tee shirt to Aaron Kronenberg. 

Sally Neef leaves Miss Erickson to Pablo Picasso. 

Ed Zinn leaves his Junior Prom record ( 7 : 00 ) to be broken. 

Sandy Albano leaves her "Thunderbaird" to Pat Andrews. 

Bill Cox leaves maybe and maybe not. 

Sarah Shaw leaves her cash register to a calculating junior. 

Carol Whitehead leaves her school spirit to her brother. 

Barbara Chapin leaves to be a Marine drill sergeant. 

Peter Strople leaves his bus service to Gary Gibson. 

Steve Shatz gives the Masacksic back to the Indians. 

Kendall Clark leaves the math department confused. 

Betsy Shepherd leaves her Elvis Presley fan club membership to Peggy Craft. 

"Flash" Doherty leaves left end open. 

Mike Mazer leaves his javelin to next year's slinger. 

Peter Guernsey leaves his height to Dale Richter. 

Andrea Leers leAAAAves. 

Sarah Caswell leaves ( rhmmm rhmmm ) for Lime Rock. 

Joan Bloom leaves the Dramatic Club . . . dramatically. 

Mike Palmer leaves for Newton, daily. 

Sam Rickless leaves his ties to Jim Chandler. 

Doug Ellis leaves typewriter, dictionary, and Men's Club membership to some as- 
piring literary "genius." 

Andy Morace leaves a pair of rather large shoes to be filled. 

Will Craft leaves his English notes to Dave Killeen. 

In line with the theme of our yearbook, Bob MacDonnell leaves his cast to Alan 
Stewart. 

We leave victory over Classical to the Juniors. 

The Senior Class leaves — L.H.S. on the map, a multitude of Kingston Trio ticket 
stubs and worn-out records, Classical decorated, the expressions "nebbish," 
"esoteric," and "you've got the chances," the library quiet (er) and the use of 
the Student Activities Room, to posterity. 

We, the Seniors, on this tenth day of June, in the year of our Lord One Thousand Nine 
Hundred and Sixty, in the town of Longmeadow, County of Hampden, and the state of 
Massachusetts, do hereby solemnly affix our names. 



Witnesses: 



ONAITA MACINTYRE 
EDWARD PRATT 



55 



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1 



JUNIOR 
CLASS OFFICERS 

J. Childs, secretary; B. Edgerly, president; W. Sproul, 
vice-president; and C. Buchdahl, treasurer. 



The election of class officers was first on the 
agenda for the Class of 1961. A new system was 
introduced whereby anyone desiring nomination 
for class office expressed his desire by submitting 
his name to Mr. Climo or Mrs. Pelczarski, the 
class advisors. After the preliminary voting, the 
class held a meeting at which each candidate 
gave a brief account of his qualifications. Wy- 
man Howard was elected president; Brian 
Edgerly, vice-president; Joni Childs, secretary; 



and Claudia Buchdahl, treasurer. Because Wy- 
man moved from Longmeadow, Brian became 
the president, and a new vote was taken electing 
Bill Sproul to the vice-presidency. The Junior 
Promenade, tastefully decorated according to a 
classical theme, was the most important project 
undertaken by the Class of '61. Elaine Giustina 
and Allan Low, co-chairmen of the dance, man- 
aged the affair very capably. 



JUNIOR 
CLASS ADVISORS 

Mr. Climo and 
Mrs. Pelczarski 



58 




r 



/^ 



n 



r> a - n 





First row: S. Aronson, B. Berman, B. Anas, P. Barnes, N. Bullock, S. Baldwin, N. Benton, S. 
Bocchino, C. Buchdahl, T. Artioli. Second row: D. Anderson, S. Bassett, P. Andrews, J. Ahern, 
C. Avery, N. Blake, C. Carlson, C. Bisesti, C. Beaver, P. Bates, B. Barker. Third row: R. Atwood, 
B. Anderson, B. Babb, E. Berg, J. Boynton, S. Benjamin, S. Barowsky, J. Chandler. 




First row: A. Evans, D. Durkin, V. Dondy, J. Childs, M. Craft, O. Drummey, P. Cullinane, P. 
Ciciarelli. Second row: P. Collins, R. Fairchild, B. Edgerly, N. Cohn, C. Coen, J. Ehrlich, G. Falken- 
berg. Third row: W. Donovan, E. Cummings, P. Clarke, N. Day, W. Coes. 



59 







First row: D. Knaus, B. Fitch, D. Howland, L. Flint, P. Gould, S. Gurland. Second row: G. 
Grandison, L. Higgenbotham, N. Frost, C. Frisbie, P. Keeney, E. Giustina, R. Karcz, J. Farrell. 
Third row: D. Guterman. J. Harkless, G. Gibson. D. Kalischer, R. Johnston. 



4KSk 



f% 



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60 



First row: J. Marcuson, B. Milner, E. Lanyon, B. Mitchell, N. Memery, L. Lawton, M. Krein, S. 
Martin. Second row: W. Leab, R. Magnacca, G. Merriam, B. Lagassa, J. Lanciaux, J. MacGregory, 
J. Merrill. Third row: F. Mahoney, W. May, M. Lauer, R. Larson, A. Levy, J. Mayock. 







First row: C. Morner, S. Sachs, C. Morris, W. Ronaldson, L. Ryder, D. Poole, J. Simonoff, M. 
Walsh. Second row: R. Moran, J. Roberts, C. Neef, L. Pratt, P. Nettleton, J. Rudd, R. Rachele, 
D. Purrington. Third row: D. O'Connor, T. Purdy, D. Richter, R. Simon, J. Nannen, B. Schiflf. 




First row: D. Terry, S. Skedden, J. Wignall, J. Tenney, S. Souliere, S. Waiksnoris, L. Waskie- 

wicz, B. Wolfram, M. Wessendorf, B. Zwirn. Second row: R. Sinclair, F. Wilson, J. Thompson, 

J. Zini, N. Stokes, S. Wagner, D. Stockman, J. Ward, A. Stewart. Third row: R. Taylor, P. Valliere, 
K. Smith, W. Sproul, L. Westcott, R. Swain 



61 






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p 

H 
O 
M 
O 
R 
E 
S 



1 

9 
6 
2 





SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

C. Cummings, treasurer; T. Paige, president; 

B. Russell, vice-president; and C. Moyer, secretary. 



The Class of 1962 began its sophomore year 
with the election of class officers. The results of 
the voting showed that Tim Paige had been 
elected president. Assisting as vice-president was 
Betsy Russell. The secretary, who kept a record 
of class events, was Cynthia Moyer, the treas- 
urer, Carolyn Cummings. 

Winter Whirl, the dance sponsored by the 
sophomore class, started the social season at 



Longmeadow High School this year. The suc- 
cess of this dance was due to the fine work of 
Roberta Goldberg, general chairman, and all 
the committees. 

Class advisors perform an important function 
for any class, and the Class of 1962 is certainly 
fortunate to have two very capable ones, Mrs. 
Wanegar and Mr. Aldrich. 




SOPHOMORE 

CLASS ADVISORS 

Mr. Aldrich and 

Mrs. Wanegar 



/ ^ 




62 







First row: M. Cayon P. Carson J. Atkinson, R. Alstrom, B. Benzell, J. Barreca, B. Benton, 
S. Carter, S. Bardach. Second row: Mrs. Leab, P. Brand, D. Cordis, T. Amyx, J. Alberti, S. Arnold 
P. Cone L. Blackburn V. Cameron, J. Condon. Third row: J. Bottone, N. Adams, J. Adiletti 
D. Charlesworth, C. Cathrew, P. Ackley, G. Burridge, B. Aronson, J. Christensen 




m£? r ° W ^ ^ Goldber «- B - Goff, V. Havens, M. Garrels, M. Hobart, A. Hinkson, C. Gold J 
Elbaum, CCumm.ngs Second row: R. Finn, T. Harrelson, J. Egan, B. Hernberg, C. Hayes,' L 
Harkless, B Ferris, J Hitz, Miss Maclntyre. Third row: P. DelVecchio, C. Downton, J. Deely 
B. Godfrey, J. Eaton, J. Harten, J. Duval, H. Heafitz. y ' 



63 



£ f C 




First row: S. MacGregor, C. A. Levin, M. Krim, T. Long, S. Lawrence, L. Marcy, M. Katten, J. 
MacLeod, N. Lichter. Second row: N. Markson, M. Levine, P. Holmgren, K. Kaynor, R. Hoff, 
M. Miller, R. Johnston, Mrs. Alonzo. Third row: J. Keiser, J. Hopkins, M. Kellerman, L. Leveton, 
M. Kaplan, T. Kamp, F. Hollister. 



pre 





.C- c l r p 



m*£\ 







62 



First row: M. E. Reidy, D. Mohrman, A. Moran, J. Proctor, C. Moyer, G. Ranslow, J. Rawles, 
B. Russell, J. Nitkowski. Second row: R. Norton, R. Rossow, T. Paige, K. Moakler, S. Roach, 
A. Murphy, K. Lang, J. Puffer, Mrs. Pelczarski. Third row: R. Margolis, A. Robson, F. Schwartz, 
T. Rachele, J. O'Grady, J. Pool, J. Norton, B. Milton, P. Rodman. 



64 







First Row: A. Szanto, L. Wallace, G. Shattuck, L. Whitefield, G. Shakour, C. Whittum, J. Shind- 
ler, L. Smith, P. Thomas, C Young. Second Row: B. Simons, F. Wayland, S. Thai, D. Wiley, 
S. Steinberg, W. Waiksnoris, R. Souliere, E. Shore, Mr. Barsum. Third Row: J. Silansky, D. Volk, 
B. Sunter, J. Wickstead, P. Weidner, R. Simmons, S. Wellman, J. Searles, L. Stahlberg. 



» P 




65 



*aT.; 



«££ 



F 
R 
E 

S 
H 
M 
E 

N 



1 

9 
6 

3 





FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 

M. A. Astaldi, vice-president; M. Mudgett, secretary; 
C. Carter, president; and B. Licht, treasurer. 



■n m 



To make the adjustment to high school somewhat easier for the freshmen, 
Miss Jensen, early in the fall, discussed with them good study habits. Soon 
afterwards, with the aid of the class advisors, Miss Baird and Mr. Joly, class 
officers were elected. Polling most votes for president was Charles Carter, and 
in second place, was Mary Alice Astaldi as vice-president. Meredith Mudgett 
was elected secretary and Barbara Licht was chosen to be treasurer. The Class 
of 1963 plans to complete their first year at LHS by sponsoring a spring dance. 



FRESHMAN 
CLASS ADVISORS 

Mr. Joly and 
Miss Baird 



66 





First row: R. Amyx, K. Berra, J. Cantwell, N. Anderson, N. Almgren, B. Bush, C. Bray, M. A. 
Astaldi. Second row: J. Bateman, D. Bisesti, R. Bloom, A. Berkeley, D. Arlen, P. Buscemi, Mr. 
Houle. Third row: R. Arnold, J. Baron, L. Bernstein, C. Carter, B. Brown, D. Barrett. 




First row: R. Driedger, S. A. Cohen, S. Dale, B. Fein, B. Corcoran, C. Darling, S. Durkin. Second 
row: R. Egan, B. Cohen, L. Davenport, G. Decker, S. Dyson, E. Conture, Mr. Aldrich. Third row: 
R. Cohen, T. Davidson, L. Day, G. Clark, R. Cowles, D. Eberhardt, W. Cogan. 



67 



f A f c t c c 




First row: S. Henry, K. Hardy, S. Hulit, P. Graham, M. Galbraith, J. Holter, D. Frisbie, M. 
Fordyce, M. Godfrey. Second row: A. Gilmour, R. Hitchins, G. Grandison, C. Jackson, L. Freedman, 
D. Jenny, G. Gibbons, J. Filkins. Third row: G. Ferguson, P. Gootzit, J. Harrelson, S. Goldberg, 
D. Hartford, S. Fox, R. Gordon 




68 



First row: B. Licht, J. Leers, L. Lerner, B. Kittridge, S. Krevalin, A. Klempner, A. Margolis. 
Second row: Mrs. McTaggart, D. Killeen, A. Long, A. Larose, M. Lane, J. Meunier, E. Johnson, 
K. Lyman, G. Lawrence. Third row: D. Kimball, F. Kraft, C. McKee, S. Mclntyre, G. Lithwin, A. 
Kronenberg, T. Lawton. 




First row: S. Pierson, V. Morse, M. 
Moquin, E. Pierce, P. Regan, J- Nettle- 
ton, J. Raymond, N. Milton. Second 
row: Mr. Haskell, A. Bloom, H. Poole, 
T. Price, M. Mudgett, C. Pitkat, S. Par- 
ker, R. Page, G. Pearson. Third row: 
W. O'Malley, L. Price, A. Paperno, M. 
Mucha, S. Parker, S. Alport, L. Oren- 
stein. 




First row: J. Siegel, P. Rich, S. Sterritt, 
P. Schwartz, K. Talbot, B. Rothman, 
E. Shatz. Second row: P. Stahl, C. 
Smith, B. Richards, J. Summersgill, L. 
Stokes, C. Snow, J. Sagalyn. Third row: 
Mr. Lopes, G. Smith, J. Sickel, C. 
Smith, D. Streeter, J. Settle, J. Sickel. 




First row: F. Wolk, S. Texeira, S. Tal- 
bot, M. Taylor, J. Waskiewicz, M. 
Wiley, C. Zwirn, Miss Eaton. Second 
row: F. White, J. Thomas, W. Wright, 
B. Young, S. Valliere, R. Wood, G. 
Wess, B. Tompkins. Third row: R. 
Vollmer, A. Waitzman, R. Upson, T. 
Tiedgen, W. Weare, N. Whitehead. 



69 



One 



mart in 



his time 







plaub manu pa/uA 




MASACKSIC STAFF 



First row: L. Wright, E. Katten, E. Dierauf, B. Chapin, 
R. Kimball, M. Mazer, S. Shatz, S. Baldwin, C. Paige S. 
Martin, R. MacDonnell, W. Cox. Second row: E. Hoppe, 
P. Kranzusch, K. Weidner, J. Bloom, J. Wiley, W. 
Adams, D. Ellis, E. Bloom, J. Mohrman, C. Morner, C. 
Morris, J. Lanciaux, P. Strople. Third row: C. Bisesti, C. 
Hitz, S. Thomas, E. Goldberg, J. Simonoff, J. Gold, C. 
Buchdahl, V. Cook, S. Shaw, A. McCullough, E. Shepard, 
Mrs. Pelczarski. Fourth row: C. Beaver, P. Ciciarelli, P. 



Trumbull, N. Rose, M. Kaplan, M. Levine, J. Wignall, 
S. Souliere, P. Gould, K. Curran, J. Cowles, Miss Erickson. 
Fifth row: W. Krim, C. D. DuBuisson, J. Merrill, C. 
Coen, D. Stockman, D. Howland, P. Craft, N. Blake, 
P. Bates, B. Milner. Sixth row: B. Zwirn, V. Dondy, M. 
Palmer, J. Thompson, V. Markarian, E. Guistina, S. Wag- 
ner, A. Leers, M. McCormack. Seventh row: R. Summers- 
gill, W. Klempner, R. Nye, C. Carlson. 



MASACKSIC 



The staff of the I960 yearbook has under- 
taken a far greater task than many realize. 
Through the efforts of Steve Shatz and his staff, 
this year's Masacksic promises to be one of 
Longmeadow High School's finest. 

Mr. Suher, Mrs. Pelczarski, and Miss Erick- 
son, our advisors, were responsible for directing 
the Masacksic staff. Early in the year, the Busi- 
ness Department began soliciting advertise- 
ments, while the Patrons and Patronesses De- 
partment organized its work. These two groups, 
in addition to the Sales Staff which arranged for 
individual purchases, were responsible for the 
financial support of the yearbook. Perhaps the 
heaviest burden of all, the actual writing of the 



Masacksic, fell upon the shoulders of the Lit- 
erary Staff. Credit for the layouts, designs, and 
the candid and group poses is due the capable 
Art and Photography Departments. 

In October, a group of editors accompanied 
by Mr. Suher as guide and advisor, represented 
the LHS Masacksic at the annual Yearbook 
Convention, which was held at Columbia Uni- 
versity. This was a novel and rewarding experi- 
ence for those who participated in the conven- 
tion program. 

Congratulations are extended to the entire 
staff of the I960 Masacksic for this outstanding 
yearbook. 



72 






■^■■■■H 




MASACKSIC CHIEFTANS 
s - Shatz s. Baldwin 




First row 
Baldwin, 



E. Dierauf, B. Chapin, C. Paige, S. Shatz, S. 
E. Katten, S. Neef, L. Wright. Second row: E. 



MASACKSIC EDITORS 



Bloom, W. Cox, R. Kimball, R. MacDonnell, W. Adams 
D. Ellis, M. Mazer, P. Strople. 



73 




JET JOTTER STAFF 

First Row: B. Chapin, J. Bloom, D. DuBuisson, M. Palmer, A. Leers, G. Dow, J. Wiley, B. Sum- 
mersgill, B. Klempner, R. Kimball, B. Coes. Second Row: B. Biondi, B. Biondi, L. Ryder, D. Poole, 
J. Ahem, B. Zwirn, G. Dondy, E. Katten, P. Ciciarelli. Third Row: A. Evans, S. Baldwin,' C. Buch- 
dahl, P. Craft, C. Morner, C. Paige, B. Lagassa, B. Milner, C. Beaver, B. Adams. Fourth Row: W. 
Krim, M. Mazer, D. Stockman, C. Coen 



EXPERIMENT IN JOURNALISM 

AIM: to turn a new and relatively inexperienced high school publication 
into a finished, professional newspaper. 

APPARATUS: two resourceful editors, one diligent and imaginative staff, 
and four untiring advisors steeped in journalistic experience. 

PROCEDURE: Begin by combining school news, world affairs, sports and 
humor in a mixture that appeals to everyone. Then add new features 
of contemporary interest such as the "Beat Bards," "Campus Corner," 
"The Blotter," and "Student of the Month." Finally, establish a definite 
pattern for the layout and printing of the paper. 

OBSERVATIONS: Notice: 

1. that the students are eagerly searching their lockers for the most recent 
issue of the "Jet Jotter." 

2. uncontrollable laughter or heated discussion in response to each article. 

CONCLUSION: The net result is a well-rounded, polished journal in both 
form and content, representing the many ideas and attitudes of Long- 
meadow students. 



74 






■ 



J 

E 
T 



J 
O 

T 

T 

E 

R 




JET JOTTER EDITORS-IN-CHIEF 

A. Leers, V. Dow. 




JET JOTTER EDITORS 

E'&iSZ^ilS^fe A XY/ ee ^ V - DoW ' J Bl00m ' SeCond Row: R Kimba11 - C D DuBuisson, 
k. aummersgill, J. Wiley, W. Klempner. 



75 




First Row: Mr. Shindler, P. Ciciarelli, V. Dow, J. Mohr- 
man, R. MacDonnell, P. Strople, M. Astaldi, Mr. Joly. 
Second Row: E. Guistina, C. Carlson, C. Carter, F. Kraft, B. 



Edgerly, T. Paige, R. Rossow, C. Moyer, M. Mudgett, C. 
Young. 



STUDENT COUNCIL 



The I960 Student Council, under president 
"Mac" MacDonnell, planned an array of ac- 
tivities aimed at increasing its Scholarship 
Fund awarded annually to two deserving sen- 
iors. In the fall, printed programs and refresh- 
ments were sold at the football games and the 
Council continued to increase its profits 
throughout the year with the sale of mono- 



grammed jackets, sweatshirts, and school book- 
covers. Additional projects included: hall patrol 
and honor study hall, two student services, and 
student travel assemblies, a Halloween dance, 
and Playday, all for the enjoyment of the stu- 
dent body. The guidance of Mr. Shindler and 
Mr. Joly enabled the Student Council to have 
one of its most successful years. 




STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS 

P. Ciciarelli, B. MacDonnell, C. Carlson, P. Strople. 



76 






NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 




Front Row: J. Mohrman, P. Ciciarelli, J. Bloom, M. Mazer, 
B. Sproul, G. Dondy, C. Paige, B. Shepard. Second Row: 
P. Valliere, S. Shaw, S. Baldwin, E. Katten, E. Swain, A. 
Leers, V. Dow, C. Beaver, P. Andrews, D. Poole, S. Shatz. 



The Longmeadow Chapter of the National 
Honor Society enjoyed one of its most active 
seasons this past year. At the first meeting, in 
September, the year's agenda was formulated 
and the following officers were elected: Elliot 
Bloom, president; Bob Summersgill, vice-pres- 
ident; Carol Beaver, secretary; and Paul Val- 
liere, treasurer. 

Soon afterwards, a coat-checking service, 
which developed into a profitable and efficient 
complement to many school functions, was re- 
sumed as a continuation of one of last year's 
projects. At the conclusion of the school year, 
the money earned in this manner will be 
presented as a scholarship to a deserving mem- 
ber of the senior class. 



Third Row: J. Felio, D. Howland, E. Bloom, K. Clark, 
R. Summersgill, M. Palmer, R. Nye, S. Martin, E. Zinn, 
J. Ahern. 



A very successful tutoring and paper-correct- 
ing program was continued again this year. 
Functioning in room thirty-two during activity 
periods, it proved a valuable aid to teachers 
and students. 

The highlight of the year was the annual 
Tea, held during the Christmas season, for the 
Honor Society alumni, present members, and 
faculty. A precedent was established by the 
use of a guest register book. 

For her invaluable guidance and able direc- 
tion, Miss Maclntyre, group advisor, deserves 
the praise and congratulations of the 1959-1960 
Honor Society and of Longmeadow High 
School. 




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY OFFICERS 

R. Summersgill, E. Bloom, C. Beaver, P. Valliere 



77 




First row: C. Abrams, J. Gold, N. Bullock, W. Krim, D. Poole, K. Kelly, K. Stothert. Second 
row: C. Downton, J. Wiley, E. Epstein, R. Summersgill, J. Ehrlich, P. Rodman. 



DEBATING CLUB 

"Vote yes on Plan A!" 

The Debating Club presented an enlightening assembly at the start of the 
year concerning the controversial issues of the coming Springfield elections. 
Throughout the year, the club met to hold informal discussions and sometimes 
formal debates on other topics. The program was under the leadership of Bill 
Krim, president; Bob Summersgill, vice-president; and Judy Gold, secretary- 
treasurer. Although much credit must be given to Mrs. Harrison for the group's 
early success, thanks also goes to Mr. Joly who took over the position of advisor 
and has stimulated continued interest in the club throughout the year. 






*%*. 



78 



DEBATING CLUB OFFICERS 

R. Summersgill, W. Krim, J. Gold 







First row: Mr. Pratt, B. Krim, B. Sproul, T. Rachelle, S. Wellman, B. Leab, J. MacGregor, R. Mag- 
nacca. Second row: B. Hoff, E. Epstein, M. Levine, F. Wayland, H. Heafitz, C. Downton, J. Christen- 
sen, T. Kamp, D. Christensen. Third row: J. Ehrlich, J. Hitz, R. Vollman, A. Kronenberg, M. 
Kaplan, B. Taylor, N. Whitehead, L. Orenstein. 



AUDIO -VISUAL AIDS CLUB 



The Audio-Visual Aids Club at Longmeadow High School serves a dual 
purpose. The club performs services for the faculty and student body while 
helping students interested in learning the operation of motion picture pro- 
jectors, tape recorders, and record players. This club is under the able guidance 
of Mr. Pratt. 



79 




First row : N. Cohn, C. Coen, E. Bloom, W. Donovan, Mr. Rossiter. 
Second row: B. Atwood, M. Levine, P. Rodman. 



PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 

Mr. Rossiter has organized the Photography Club into an important 
school service. This year Dave DuBuisson was elected president; Duncan For- 
dyce, vice-president and laboratory chief; and Elliot Bloom, treasurer. During 
the autumn, the Club aided the Athletic Department by filming all the home 
football games. Thus the coaches were able to improve the team by correcting 
past mistakes. Many of the Masacksic and Jet Jotter pictures have been taken 
and processed by the members of the Photography Club as another service to 
the school. 



80 



■ 




First row: G. Langevin, A. White, B. Biondi, C. Boltrucyk, J. Wignall, B. Wolfram, J. Zini. 
Second row: E. Gilmour, J. Cowles, M. Fisher, M. L. Ranslow, S. Hammonds, S. Souliere, K. 
Curran, P. Gould. Third row: Mr. Dankevich, T. Vignone, A. Morace, R. Fairchild, S. Rickless. 



BUSINESS CLUB 

The Business Club, composed of students who must be taking at least one 
business course, met early in the year to choose their officers: Carol Bultrucyk, 
president; Andy Morace, vice-president; Alice White, secretary; and Barbara 
Biondi, treasurer. Under the supervision of Mr. Dankevi ch, the group planned 
several trips to local offices and business establishments so that the students 
could have direct contact with office procedures. Many members of the Business 
Club have already applied their clerical skills by serving as Office Aides and by 
preparing typewritten material for the faculty. 




BUSINESS CLUB 
OFFICERS 

B. Biondi, C. Boltrucyk, A. 
Morace, A. White. 



81 




Mrs. Howe, E. Goldberg, J. Simonoff, E. Katten, 
C. Abrams, S. Bassett, E. Hoppe. 



JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT BANK 



The Lancer Savings Bank began its fourth 
year of operation with an excellent start. 
Under the direction of Jackie Simonoff, the 
executive vice-president of the Longmeadow 
branch of the Junior Achievement Bank, the 
15-24 Club was initiated. Students who banked 
for fifteen of the possible twenty-four weeks of 
banking received a premium, and became 
members of the 15-24 Club. The school ad- 
visor, Mrs. Howe, and the advisors from the 
Springfield Institution for Savings, Mr. Cross 



and Mrs. Geary, have aided the Lancer Bank 
in its attempt to open more new accounts than 
the other Junior Achievement Banks in this 
area. Another phase of business promotion 
was to encourage freshmen to use the Bank's 
services. 

The Junior Achievement Bank, which serves 
both the student body and the faculty, has 
proved to be one of the school's notable organ- 
izations. 



82 







First Row: M. Mazer, B. Sproul, J. Duval, P. Collins, A. 
Wood, R. Kimball, M. Kana, D. Robb, W. Cox. Second 
Row: Mr. Shindler, J. Gould, B. Babb, M. Lauer, S. Rick- 
less, T. Astaldi, M. Cimini, J. Mayock, W. Leab. Third 



Row: P. Clarke, C. Coen, R. Murphy, B. Edgerly, M. 
O'Malley, J. Wiley, A. Low, B. Taylor, W. Krim. Fourth 
Row: E. Zinn, B. Summersgill, P. Strople, B. Doherry, 
B. Nye, D. Richter, B. MacDonnell, S. Shatz, E. Bloom. 



TRAFFIC SQUAD 



Down the hall runs a fair young maiden, 
With books and papers heavy laden. 
'Round the corner sits a traffic squad man 
Who'll attempt to detain her if he can. 
"Let's see your pass," he says with glee, 
She produces one unfortunately. 



This year the Longmeadow High School 
Traffic Squad, headed by Bill Cox, has con- 
tributed to the school's orderly operation. A 
new responsibility of maintaining order in the 
lunchroom has been delegated to the squad this 
year and has met with excellent results. 




TRAFFIC SQUAD CAPTAINS 
R. MacDonnell, W. Cox, D. Robb, S. Shatz 



83 




First Row: S. Sachs, G. Markarian, B. Milner, N. Frost, 
L. Lawton, E. Hoppe, B. Sproul, S. Albano, N. Stokes, 

B. Lanyon, J. Rudd, R. Alstrom. Second Row: Mrs. Blake- 
borough, C. Bisesti, J. Mafcuson, S. Gurland, L. Ryder, 
G. Dondy, C. Beaver, M. Krein, D. Howland, S. Neef, 

C. Avery, S. Arnold, T. Amyx. Third Row: L. Pratt, S. 
Martin, J. Simonoff, R. Harten, P. Trumbull, L. Rose, 
J. Cowles, D. Pratt, J. Felio, P. Gould, B. Zwirn, S. Skedden. 



Fourth Row: C. Hayes, D. Terry, S. Thomas, L. Wright, 
S. Bassett, N. Blake, W. Ronaldson, S. Hulit, J. Raymond, 
K. Hardy, S. Texeira, K. Kelly. Fifth Row: B. Corcoran, 
C. Cummings, G. Gustafson, E. Dierauf, K. Weidner, R. 
Goldberg, M. Katten, M. Krim, L. Blackburn, M. Wiley. 
Sixth Row: M. Lane, V. Havens, V. Cameron, A. Hinkson, 
M. Cimini, R. Taylor, J. Ehrlich, G. Langevin, V. Cook, 
N. Bullock, S. Dale. 



JUNIOR RED CROSS CLUB 



In 1959-1960, the Junior Red Cross Club 
experienced its most successful year since its 
organization in 1955. It began its season with 
a membership drive, enrolling sixty-five per- 
cent of the student body. The money collected 
during the drive was used for the many pro- 
jects which the club undertook during the year. 
The members supervised a Christmas party at 
Monson State Hospital, provided decorations 
for a party at the Veterans Hospital in Leeds, 



and performed service work at Wesson Ma- 
ternity Hospital and the South End Community 
Center. 

The success of the club's program was due 
not only to its many members but also to its 
capable leaders: Mrs. Blakeborough, advisor; 
Bill Sproul, president; Erna Hoppe, vice-pres- 
ident; Nancy Stokes, treasurer; and Sandy Al- 
bano, secretary. 




84 



RED CROSS OFFICERS 

S. Albano, B. Sproul, E. Hoppe, N. Stokes 



MATH CLUB 




First Row: P. Andrews, B. Benzell, J. Thompson, R. Simons, D. Magnacca, J. Farrell, S. Shaw, 
T. McCormack. Second Row: L. Smith, J. Christensen, E. Epstein, K. Clark, D. Christensen, S. 
Parker, J. Gould, M. Cimini, S. MacGregor. 



One of the first events of the new year at LHS was the organization of the 
Math Club. Plans for a successful and active program were formulated at its 
first meeting in February. The purpose of this club is to provide interested 
students an opportunity to discuss mathematical aspects and problems that 
are not covered in the classroom. Mr. Aldrich, advisor, is to be commended 
for the direction he has given to this club's establishment. 



85 



.**: 



AIDES 



The cafeteria aides undertake various jobs such as making change, cashier- 
ing, and serving teachers' lunches during the lunch period. After lunch it is 
their responsibility to total all the receipts. Sara Shaw, the student cafeteria 
manager, organizes this efficient group. 

Assisting in the main office are the office aides. They do many time con- 
suming tasks such as sorting mail, typing and filing reports, and operating the 
switchboard and mimeograph machines. 

Miss Baird, our librarian, is aided by students who perform routine duties 
which are necessary to keep the library functioning properly. The assistants' 
principal jobs are to charge books, prepare new editions for circulation, and 
replace returned copies on the shelves. 



AP( ' V<\ fVMiill'. \ 

all !a! Inn he* 

j)' rs.V m Ih 
Vlt ><((' 




CAFETERIA AIDES 

Front row: T. Rachele, J. Poole, P. Strople, R. Nye, W. Adams, R. Taylor, J. Wiley, H. Heafitz. 
Back row: E . Shepard, J. Mohrman, B. Zwirn, C. Morris, C. Carlson, K. Weidner, N. Stokes, J. 
Miller, E. Katten, S. Shaw, R. Alstrom, N. Benton, C. Cummings. 



86 




LIBRARY AIDES 

First row: B. Zwirn, E. Goldberg, S. Steinberg. Second row: Miss Baird, J. Gold, J. Roberts, A. 
White, J. Chandler, J. Marcuson, G. Burridge. Third row: Dale Richter. 




OFFICE AIDES 

B. Biondi, D. Breglio, S. Benjamin, M. Coulomb. 



87 




First row: J. Mohrman, N. Lichter, A. Evans, P. Ciciarelli, 
E. Shatz, B. Milner, C. Buchdahl, C. Morner, N. Frost, B. 
Lagassa, B. Zwirn, J. Siegel, G. Markarian. Second row: 
Miss Maclntyre, G. Cook, E. Fein. J. Simonoff, S. Gurland, 
J. Wignall, S. Baldwin, L. Freedman, C. Gold, S. Sachs, 
J. Leers, A. Klempner, "Mrs. Alonzo. Third row: G. Dondy, 
C. Beaver, R. Harten, R. Alstrom, J. Alberti, E. Swain, M. 



Krim, J. Ahern, M. Katten, D. Terry, S. Wagner, J. Mar- 
cuson. Fourth row: P. Craft, G. Dow, J. Bloom, S. Flint, 
N. Stokes, P. Nettleton, L. Lawton, A. Leers, E. Katten, C. 
Bisesti, P. Andrews. Fifth row: P. Bates, M. Krein, S. 
Martin, E. Dierauf, B. Nye, E. Epstein, B. Summersgill, J. 
Wiley, D. Pratt, K. Weidner, L. Pratt, D. Howland, M. 
Levine, J. Ehrlich, M. Mazer. 



THE FRENCH CLUB 



88 



"Le Cercle Frangais" of Longmeadow High School, now in its second year, 
held its first meeting in December and elected the following officers: Mike 
Mazer, president; Joan Mohrman, vice-president; Andrea Leers, secretary; and 
Liz Katten, treasurer. At the same meeting, it was decided that membership 
would be open to all students who were presently enrolled in French classes. 
Then, an interesting program was presented by Eline Dierauf concerning her 
recent European travels. Under the able direction of Mrs. Alonzo, "les bavar- 
deurs" have planned an entertaining and educational year. Tentative plans in- 
clude a "Mardi Gras," lectures, French movies and correspondence with French 
pen pals. Since all meetings are conducted in French, the students not only en- 
joy themselves, but they also acquire invaluable oral practice. 




FRENCH CLUB OFFICERS 

A. Leers, M. Mazer, J. Mohrman, E. Katten. 







First row: C. Snow, S. Valliere, B. Hinkson, T. McCormack, 
A. Hinkson, M. Garrels, B. Benzell, G. Shattuck, J. Ray- 
mond, S. Hulit. Second row: Mrs. Pelczarski, P. Ciciarelli, 
J. MacLeod, C. Abrams, S. Sterritt, C. Gold, S. Henry, B. 
Zwirn, V. Havens, J. Atkinson, C. Zwirn. Third row: Mrs. 
Leab, J. Summersgill, S. Dale, P. Andrews, S. Gurland, C. 



Beaver, J. Rudd, R. Alstrom, G. Dondy, L. Stokes. Fourth 
row: L. Blackburn, G. Dow, J. Alberti, A. Leers, K. Kaynor, 
L. Lawton, S. Lawrence, B. Hernberg, E. Swain, J. Ahern, 
C. Bisesti. Fifth row: M. Palmer, J. Thompson, D. Ellis, 
B. Adams, P. Valliere. 



LATIN CLUB 



The Latin Forum, one of the largest school organizations, whose mem- 
bership is open to students of the second, third, and fourth year Latin classes, is 
also a very active club. Under the able direction of Paul Valliere, president; 
Carol Beaver, vice-president- Virginia Dondy, secretary, and Bill Craig, treas- 
urer; and the capable supervision of Mrs. Leab, Mrs. Pelczarski, and Mrs. Wan- 
egar, advisors, many projects were successfully undertaken. Among these was 
the presentation of the movie Julius Caesar which provided a cultural and his- 
torical background for the Latin courses. The Club also secured membership in 
the Junior Classical League, an organization which promotes cultural interest 
in Latin. 

The Latin Auxilia, composed of only first year students, was started this 
year to accommodate the growing number of students interested in Latin. Sue 
Valliere was the president while Sally Lawrence became vice-president. The 
treasurer was Carolyn Snow, and the secretary, Sue Dale. This organization was 
sponsored by the same advisors and enjoyed a program similar to that of the 
Latin Forum. The ambitious endeavors of the members of these two groups 
certainly merit for them "maximam laudem." 



LATIN. CLUB OFFICERS 
/. Dondy, P. Valliere, C. Beaver, 
3. Craig. 





CREATIVE WRITING CLUB 




First Row: B. Lagassa, C. Beaver, L. Ryder, J. Felio, P. Schwartz, C. Abrams, J. Nitkowski 
Second Row: J. Proctor, P. Valliere, P. Clarke, J. Chandler, W. Harkless, J. Settle, Miss Eaton. 



This year, a new activity, the Creative Writing Club, was formed by 
interested students. The purpose of the club is to stimulate an interest in 
creative writing among the students. More importantly, it offers an opportunity 
for student writers to have their works appraised and constructively criticized 
by others. There was such a large response during the first few meetings, that 
it was necessary to limit the membership. Active members were chosen from 
authors of submitted works and these students took part in all discussion meet- 
ings. Auditors were allowed to be present during meetings, but did not take 
part in the discussion. 



90 



FUTURE TEACHERS OF AMERICA CLUB 





First Row: J. MacLeod, J. Rudd, S. Dyson, C. Neef, A. McCullough, P. Andrews, D. Frisbie, 
T. McCormack. Second Row: Mr. Houle, J. Nitkowski, D. Durkin, B. Hernberg, C. Bisesti, P. 
Holmgren, P. Nettleton, J. Nettleton, K. Hardy. 



After recommendation by the Student Council, The Future Teachers of 
America Club was organized under the able supervision of Mr. Houle. The 
purpose of this organization, as expressed in its charter, is to "develop an 
awareness of the privileges and responsibilities of the teaching profession." In 
order to acquaint the members with this career, a program of movies, lectures, 
and actual teaching observation was conducted. Leading the club were its 
officers: Cherry Neef, president; Ann McCullough, vice-president; Sandra 
Dyson, secretary; Patricia Andrews, treasurer; and Deborah Frisbie, librarian. 



91 




First Row: K. Stothert, C. Beaver, G. Dow, J. Alberti, J. Bloom, Mr. Lopes. 
Second Row: M. Mazer, E. Zinn, B. Nye, B. Sproul, E. Epstein. 



DRAMATIC CLUB 



Prompted by the success of previous plays, the I960 Dramatic Club set out 
once more to make its mark in the theatrical world with the presentation of 
Patterson Greene's Papa Is /III. This story of a Pennsylvania Dutch mother, 
daughter, and son who rebel against a tyrannical father was well executed 
although the cast members were confronted with an added challenge — the 
mastery of dialect. The unusually small cast, consisting of Carol Beaver, Joan 
Bloom, Ginny Dow, Ed Epstein, Mike Mazer, and Bob Nye, was supplemented 
this year by a full understudy cast, an innovation which, Mr. Lopes felt, would 
offer good experience to future Thespians. 

For this group, certainly, "All the world's a stage"! 



92 







First Row: D. Breglio, S. Bassett, E. Hoppe, D. Keith, M. Clark, J. Thompson, B. Zwirn, A. Mc- 
Cullough, T. McCormack, C. Hitz, S. Shaw. Second Row: S. Neef, L. Flint, J. Barreca, S. Sachs, 
P. Barnes, C. Frisbie, N. Benton, P. Gould, D. Terry, B. Lanyon, Miss Erickson. Third Row: K. 
Weidner, K. Kaynor, B. Benzell, N. Hilsinger, L. Larkin, L. Ryder, P. Cone, J. Felio, D. Howland, 
M. Krein, S. Martin. 



CYCLORAMISTS 



Brushes flying and imaginations hard at work, the Cycloramists again 
created the sets for the annual Dramatic Club presentation. Guided by Miss 
Erickson, the group designed the interior of the Aukamp home, the scene of 
Papa is All, and aided with such important preparations as make-up and cos- 
tuming. In any theatrical production, the off-stage crew is as necessary to the 
success of the performance as is the cast, and the Longmeadow Cycloramists did 
create excellent effects to intensify the atmosphere of the play. 



93 






ff 



> 



a 






v 



GLEE CLUB 



First Row: S. Waiksnoris, S. Bocchino, P. Carson, C. Moyer, 
D. Wiley, C. Frisbie, J. Lanciaux, L. Flint, B. Shepard, E. 
Swain, D. Pratt. Second Row: J. Cowles, P. Trumbull, P. 
Kranzusch, J. Bloom, A. Szanto, N. Rose, M. Coulomb, 
C. Beaver, W. Ronaldson, R. Reed, E. Dierauf, S. Thomas, 
K. Weidner. Third Row: J. Rawles, L. Pratt, C. Morris, 
C. Carlson, J. Filkins, J. Duval, B. Aldrich, J. Wickstead, 
C. Jackson, E. Shore, G. Grandison, N. Stokes, P. Keeney, 
S. Wagner, G. Dondy. Fourth Row: S. Skedden, L. Ryder, 
P. Andrews, D. Howland, D. Adams, S. Parker, K. Clark, 
C. Carter, W. Donovan, R. Simons, P. Weidner, V. Shakour, 



P. Ciciarelli, C. Hayes, J. Barreca. Fifth Row: B. Hernberg, 
M. Krein, M. Wessendorf, C. Avery, B. Nye, H. Adams, 
H. Decker, A. Hoekstra, J. Adiletti, W. Waiksnoris, E. 
Epstein, L. Lawton, A. Evans, B. Milner, L. Smith. Sixth 
Row: C. Whitehead, P. Craft, B. Lagassa, J. Norton, C. 
Clark, B. Anderson, G. Snyder, T. Vignone, K. Krohne, T. 
Rachele, B. Sutherland, O. Drummey, N. Frost. Seventh 
Row: J. Alberti, V. Cook, S. Shaw, L. Waskiewicz, T. Har- 
relson, D. Stockman, N. Cohn, J. Baron, D. Streeter, R. 
Cowles, E. TenBroek, J. Ahem, J. Childs. 



MUSIC 



The music organizations of Longmeadow 
High School have indeed been fortunate to have 
Mr. Burkle as their instructor. Through his ef- 
forts the music groups this year not only have 
equaled last year's excellent quality but also 
have surpassed it. A very high percentage of 
students have participated in the high school's 
wide variety of musical organizations. 

The Glee Club, a group representing grades 
ten through twelve, performed at the Christmas 
assembly, singing both traditional and novelty 
songs of the holiday season. Lyrics, a small 
choir consisting of thirty select students, per- 



formed at various gatherings in Longmeadow, 
the Christmas assembly, a meeting of the Junior 
Extension, and at other Longmeadow schools. 

The Band and Orchestra are our two instru- 
mental groups. The Band played at many of 
our home football and basketball games and 
contributed greatly to the students' spirit. The 
Band also provided marching music for all of 
the Drill Team performances. The Orchestra 
played for various assemblies and, with the 
above mentioned groups, participated in the 
Spring Concert and the Western Massachusetts 
Music Festival. 



94 



— 











— 




J*tei Jflte- JbJ 




BAND 



First Row: B. Schiff, R. Swain, E. Swain, A. Bloom, R. 
Driedger. Second Row: S. Valliere, D. Frisbie, G. Pearson, 
B. Benzell, R. Simons, S. Waiksnoris, K. Clark, G. Law- 
rence, A. Klempner, M. Levine, D. Christensen. Third Row: 
P. Valliere, H. Decker, C. Downton, N. Cohn, J. Ward, 



A. Long, S. Souliere, C. Clark, V. Morse, E. TenBroeck, 
R. Finn, J. Norton, B. Bullions, P. Weidner, J. Hunter, B. 
Atwood. Fourth Row: J. Baron, G. Tincknell, J. Wickstead, 
S. Alport, C. Jackson, B. L. Mjtchell, B. Sutherland, J. 
Harrelson. 




DRUM MAJORETTES 

First Row: P. Schwartz, C. Hitz, J. Raymond. 
Second Row: K. Kelly, S. Pierson, S. Hulit. 



95 




ORCHESTRA 



First Row: R. Simons, G. Tincknell, E. Swain, A. Bloom, Third Row: J. Nettleton, K. Stothert, R. Bloom, B. Benzell, 
J. Barreca, R. Swain, B. Donovan, J. Bloom. Second Row: K. Clark. Fourth Row: S. Alport, J. Wickstead, J. Waskie- 



B. Hernberg, M. Mudgett, J. Alberti, D. Frisbie, G. Pear- 
son, S. Waiksnoris, J. Norton, B. Atwood, P. Valliere. 



wicz, E. TenBroeck. 




fi C f^ 











GIRLS' CHORUS 

First Row: K. Talbot, B. Cohen, E. Pierce, S. Pierson, P. Regan, G. Shattuck, N. Anderson. Fourth Row: J. Siegal, 

J. Meunier, V. Cameron. Second Row: S. Dale, B. Corcoran, B. Fein, B. Licht, P. Thomas, B. Young, M. Taylor, N. 

S. Sterritt, K. Berra, C. Pitkat, P. Schwartz, M. Fordyce, Milton, M. A. Astaldi. 
G. Decker. Third Row: E. Stokes, P. Graham, B. Rotham, 



96 



























































































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LYRICS 



First Row: J. Bloom, S. Bocchino, D. Wiley, P. Carson, 
C. Moyer, E. Swain, W. Ronaldson, J. Lanciaux, B. 
Shepard. Second Row: S. Waiksnoris, S. Shaw, C. Morris, 
J. Norton, G. Grandison, J. Filkins, B. Donovan, H. 
Decker, R. Bloom, C. Beaver, E. TenBroeck. Third Row: 



C. Frisbie, C. Whitehead, K. Clark, J. Duval, E. Epstein, 
C. Carter, J. Childs, N. Stokes, L. Flint, D. Pratt. Fourth 
Row: P. Weidner, N. Cohn, B. Adams, B. Aldrich, B. Nye, 
J. Wickstea'd. 



Bob Nye is shown while 
rehearsing for one of his 
concerts. 



SCIENCE FAIR 

Science students, engaging in the studies of physics, 
chemistry, and biology, displayed their initiative and 
creative abilities at the fourth annual Science Fail 
held in April of 1959. About 120 students partici- 
pated with 80 projects on exhibit under the direction 
of Mr. Finklehoffe, faculty supervisor. 

The board of judges, comprised of science instruc- 
tors from Springfield schools and local colleges, and 
representatives of industry and business, selected 
Dave Taylor's and Bob Larson's project, "Fuel Injec- 
tion System," as the first prize-winner. Ed Trachten- 
berg placed second with his project entitled, "Gibber- 
ellic Acid" and third prize was claimed by Dave Neef 
and Marcia Clark for their entry on "Oil Testing." 

Many townspeople as well as students visited the 
science exhibit which proved the high caliber of inde- 
pendent work of which Longmeadow students are 
capable. 






EMBRYOLOGY 

or a 

CHICKEN 








JUNIOR PROM 



An evening in picturesque Holland, 
amidst colorful tulips and windmills 
will always remain in our fondest me- 
mories as we recall the 1959 Junior 
Class Prom, "Nether-Netherlands." Dick 
Murphy, general chairman, proved most 
capable in successfully co-ordinating the 
dance committees. From a court of 
king and queen candidates Bob Mac- 
Donnell and Sue Thomas were chosen 
to reign as King and Queen. The Junior 
Prom of 1959, certainly an enjoyable 
evening for all, will long be remem- 
bered. 




PLAYDAY 

"Attention! Attention, please! Today is Playday!" 
. . . When this welcome announcement came over 
the P.A. one undisclosed day last spring, the student 
body suddenly perked up and enthusiastically pre- 
pared for its yearly jaunt to Bliss Road Park. 

Under the supervision of the Student Council and 
Leaders' Club, students and faculty enjoyed Softball 
and volleyball games, relay and novelty races, tugs- 
of-war, and tennis matches. In last year's event, the 
Class of 1959, having accumulated the most points 
in the competition games, earned its place on the 
Playday Plaque. As these photographs indicate, 
everybody thoroughly enjoyed the change from the 
normal school routine. 




Seniors lose to the freshmen! 




How's lunch? 





v <r: 



Ready! On your mark! 



The Boys. 



FUNDAY 



The Student Council initiated another "first" 
in 1959 when it sponsored a Funday, or student- 
faculty talent show. Mr. Suher was faculty direc- 
tor, and Bob Kittredge, Charlotte Carlson, Joan 
Mohrman, Peter Strople, and Brian Edgerly 
were the Student Council co-ordinators. 

An original skit entitled "Save Our School," 
featuring Sue Lawsing, Dick Murphy, Amy 
Young, Bob Kittredge, and Paul Brouwer, 
opened the show. Next were performances by 
instrumental, vocal, and dance groups. Finally, 
the emcee, Bob MacDonnell, announced the 



faculty's presentations. After seeing the teach- 
ers perform in modern dance groups, Charleston 
numbers, a melodrama, and an "omnibus" of 
witticism, the student audience realized that 
many of their teachers had been keeping secret 
talents from them. One of the star attractions 
was a number by the McQueer Sisters (Miles. 
Josselyn, Ursprung, D' Agostino, and Haskell ) . 
The Funday, providing many laughs for both 
the audience and participants as well as funds 
for the Student Council Scholarship, was enter- 
taining and successful for all. 




AL 



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103 



AWARDS 
ASSEMBLY 



The final assembly, held during the 
last week of school, was a big event for 
all underclassmen. Presentations of an- 
nual awards recognized the notable 
achievements of the students. Now that 
the academic year had formally ended, 
the Class of I960 found themselves the 
new leaders of the school. 




Ed Mulkerin congratulates Bob MacDonnell, who will take 
over the leadership of our Student Council. 





"Congratulations" — Elliot Bloom receives The Harvard 
Book Award for his scholastic achievement. 



Joan Bloom learns that she has been chosen as governor's 
aide at the Eastern States Exposition. 




Mr. Macfarlane presents Peter Strople with the Williams Ginny Dow is honored as Girls' State representative. 

Book Award. 





Bob Kittredge and Ed Mulkerin, recipients of the Coaches' 
Award, are very pleased as they are congratulated by Mr. 
Macfarlane. 



Andrea Leers becomes co-editor of the Jet Jotter. 



105 



LATIN 
BANQUET 



Who said Latin is dead? 

The annual Cena Romana brought Latin 
back to life by following the customs and 
culture which accompany the language. The 
banquet familiarized the many guests, Latin 
students as well as faculty, with certain as- 
pects of Roman life, since authentic meth- 
ods and etiquette were observed as closely as 
possible. 

Arrayed in appropriate Roman garb, the 
guests transformed the atmosphere of the 
cafeteria to the days of old Rome. As the 
patricians reclined on their couches, the 
banquet formally began. First year students 
costumed in the tunics of slaves, performed 
their designated tasks. 

Musical selections, a dance by an Egyp- 
tian captive, and gladiatorial games com- 
pleted the evening's festivities. This major 
project of the Latin Club proved to be a 
most satisfying and successful event. 







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tncLs ihib exnmtjul hwlmu 




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Senior Week 

Senior week began last year with a banquet 
at Wiggins Tavern. Then, two days later, the 
seniors enjoyed their Prom with its striking 
Oriental theme. The next night, marshalled by 
Ginny Dow and Bob MacDonnell, the Class of 
1959 graduated. Ed Mulkerin, class president, 
introduced the main speaker, Mr. Glenn Olds, 
president of Springfield College. His inspiring 
speech and the messages of Mr. Macf arlane and 
Mr. Herrschaft offered the graduates valuable 
guides for a life's philosophy. 

As we, the Class of I960, look over these 
pictures of last year's Senior Week, we realize, 
with mixed emotions, that we too will play the 
same parts. 





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BANQUET 



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VARSITY BASEBALL 

First Row: A. Klutch, P. Stone, T. Astaldi, E. Mulkerin, T. Ewing, N. Cummings, W. Craft. 
Second Row: A. Stewart, G. Snyder, P. Brouwer, R. MacDonnell. D. Cort. Third Row: Mr. D'Agos- 
tino, J. Johnston, D. Murphy, R. Zanolli, H. Heafitz. 



BASEBALL 



Once again, under the able coaching of Mr. D'Agostino, 
the Longmeadow High baseball team posted a winning record, 
7-6. This was disappointing in view of the fact that the bulk 
of the previous year's undefeated nine had returned. However, 
the reason may have been the result of the scheduling of several 
new strong powers. 

The Lancers started the season on the wrong foot, but down 
the stretch, they were unbeatable as they bowled over the top 
teams in the area. Wins over Ludlow, which finished the season 
18-1, and arch-rival Classical, which was the runner-up in the 
Western Massachusetts Tournament, made the season far from 
dismal. 

In post season selections, Longmeadow High placed three 
men on the Western Massachusetts Honorable Mention List. 
Versatile Glenn Snyder was picked for his hitting and pitching. 
Dick Zanolli received recognition for his slugging and fielding 
in the hot corner, while Alex Klutch was honored for his 
strong pitching. 



BASEBALL SCORES 



Longmeadow 


5 


Commerce 


6 


Longmeadow 


2 


Classical 


6 


Longmeadow 


8 


South Had ley 


7 


Longmeadow 


3 


Enfield 


5 


Longmeadow 


3 


Ludlow 


5 


Longmeadow 


15 


Trade 





Longmeadow 


13 


Holyoke Cath 


7 


Longmeadow 


2 


Ludlow 


1 


Longmeadow 


1 


Classical 





Longmeadow 


16 


Trade 


2 


Longmeadow 


3 


Tech 


4 


Longmeadow 


5 


Tech 


7 


Longmeadow 


13 


Commerce 


2 



118 




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DICK MURPHY 

/ 



GLENN SNYDER 



DOC CORT 



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BOB MacDONNELL 



BILL CRAFT 



TOM ASTALDI 



JUNIOR VARSITY BASEBALL 

The Longmeadow J.V. baseball team, coached winning season. This year the varsity can ex- 

by Mr. Josselyn, ended the season with a record pect to see some of the J.V.'s, who gained val- 

of eight victories and two losses. Pitchers Brian uable experience last year, being promoted to 

Edgerly and Jeff Hopkins led the team to its the higher ranks. 








•,'«••<.,. *.» 











First Row: H. Heafitz, B. Bateman, R. Taylor, D. Richter, Second Row: D. Purrington, G. Gibson, J. Mayock, R. 

B. Edgerly, K. Lang, L. Westcott, P. Clarke, Mr. Josselyn. Johnston, T Paige, P. DelVecchio, J. Deely, F. Hollister, ,19 

J. MacGregory. 




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In the first game of the season Commerce 
High overcame a 5-1 deficit in the bottom of the 
ninth inning to score five unearned runs and 
to stun the Lancers 6-5. It was a heartbreaker 
for starter and loser Dick Murphy who held 
Commerce hitless through the first six innings 
and who ended the game, his first varsity start, 
with seventeen strikeouts. 

Jack Johnston's triple and l^eddy Cummings' 
single gave Longmeadow a short-lived 1-0 lead 
before Classical broke through in the bottom of 
the seventh inning, due to a comedy of errors, 
and gained a 6-1 lead. The Lancers threatened 
in the top of the ninth but some fine fielding 
by Classical helped to quell the rally. Glenn 
Snyder, who weakened in the late innings, 
pitched hitless ball through the first five and 
two-thirds innings. 

A lack of defense on Longmeadow's part let 
South Hadley remain in contention until Long- 
meadow produced a run on clutch hits by Phil 
Stone and Ed Mulkerin in the tenth inning to 
win 8-7. Alex Klutch made his first appearance 
on the mound and turned in an excellent relief 
job for starter Dick Murphy, who struck out 
thirteen men before retiring in the seventh in- 
ning. 

Enfield's best pitcher proved too much for 
the Lancers as they could only scatter four hits 
off him and went down to their third defeat of 
the season, 5-3. 

A three run rally, featured by Al Stewart's 
two-run single, was not enough to beat the 
Ludlow Lions as the Lancers lost 5-3. 

The Lancers, playing their first home game 
of the season, thumped Springfield Trade 15-0. 
Alex Klutch administered the whitewash as he 
permitted only one scratch hit of the infield 
variety, did not walk a single batter, and struck 
out the amazing number of seventeen oppo- 
nents. The fifteen hit attack was led by Dick 
Zanolli. 



120 



Glenn Snyder, who also pitched the win, with 
four hits and Dick Zanolli and Doc Cort with 
three each, led a heavy hitting Longmeadow 
team to a fourteen hit attack as it rapped Hol- 
yoke Catholic 13-7. 

Alex Klutch, who pitched the winner, 
knocked home the winning run with a sacrifice 
fly as Longmeadow bested Ludlow High, which 
sported a 16-0 record at game time, by the 
score of 2-1. Clutch hitting by Doc Cort, Neddy 
Cummings, Jack Johnson, and Glenn Snyder 
helped in the victory. 

On May 16, Alex Klutch, again on the 
mound, was sported a one run lead in the first 
inning and proceeded to baffle Longmeadow's 
arch-rival, the Classical Bulldogs, 1-0 on just 
three scattered hits. Glenn Snyder scored the 
lone run as he reached base via a single and 
came home on Neddy Cummings' hit that fol- 
lowed. 

Dick Murphy pitched a four-hitter while the 
other Lancers supported him with good hitting 
and high scoring as they walloped Trade 16-2. 
Dick Zanolli led the team, reaching base six 
times on three hits and three walks. 

In a game played during poor conditions 
because rain fell intermittently throughout the 
contest, the Lancers were edged in the tenth 
inning by the Technical High Tigers, 4-3. Dick 
Murphy absorbed the loss as the Tigers pushed 
across their winning run on an error and three 
bases on balls. 

A home run by the Tech pitcher accounted 
for the final two runs as Technical once again 
bested Longmeadow by a score of 7-5. Stand- 
out performance for the Lancers was the pitch- 
ing of loser Alex Klutch who struck out four- 
teen men in the seven innings that he hurled. 

The Lancers ended their season with a solid 
victory over Commerce by a score of 13-2. 
Pitcher Glenn Snyder went the distance for the 
Longmeadow win. 




■> -. 




121 




VARSITY TRACK 



First Row: L. Stahlberg, J. Lawsing, W. Leab, J. Hunter, 
K. Clark, M. Mazer, D. Richter, E. Epstein, B. Donovan. 
Second Row: S. Wellman, J. Hitz, B. Aldrich, B. Kittredge, 



C. Hollister, D. Harper, W. Cox, J. Thompson, J. Merrill. 
Third Row: M. Canter, A. Mayer, B. Schiff, D. Forth, D. 
Christensen, Mr. Climo, Mr. Ursprung. 



TRACK 



TRACK RECORD 



Longmeadow 45 
Longmeadow 42 
Longmeadow 3 1 
Longmeadow 80 % 
Longmeadow 36% 
Longmeadow 41 % 



Amherst 63 

Agawam 53 Enfield 37 

Cathedral 77 

East Windsor 32% 

W. Springfield 5 5 % Agawajn 40 

Classical 59% Enfield 30% 



Although the 1959 Lancer track team had 
only one win, this record does not indicate some 
of the fine performances of individual members. 
The outstanding man on the squad was Bob 
Kittredge, an almost consistent winner in the 
220-yard dash and the 120-yard low hurdles. 
Other high point men were Jim Lawsing, Ken 
Clark, Bill Cox, and Bruce Aldrich. 

The first meet of the year was against Am- 
herst. Although the Lancer cindermen lost 63 
to 45, they fought hard and well. The out- 
standing performances of the day were by Bob 
Kittredge in the 220- and 180-yard hurdles, 
Bill Cox in the 100-yard dash and discus throw, 
Jim Lawsing in the pole vault and broad jump, 
and Dave Richter in the 440-yard dash. 

The next competition, a tri-meet, was held 
with Agawam and Enfield. Due to their spirited 
action, Longmeadow captured second place by 
a few points. Again, Dave Richter, Jim Law- 



122 



sing, Bill Cox, and Bob Kittredge earned first 
places. 

For the third encounter of the season, Long- 
meadow met a powerful squad from Cathedral. 
The Lancers swept the 180-hurdles and 220- 
yard dash, but this lead was gradually narrowed 
as Cathedral pulled ahead to a final score of 
77 to 31. The deciding factors in their win 
were a sweep in the broad jump and near sweeps 
in the seven other events. 

In the next contest, the Lancer team, un- 
limited by the number of events individuals 
could enter, beat East Windsor 80% to 3 2%. 
This was their first victory of the season. Star- 
ring for Longmeadow were Mike Mazer, Bob 
Kittredge, Ken Clark, Jim Lawsing, and Dave 
Richter. 

For the next meet, Longmeadow hosted West 
Springfield and Agawam. Charlie Hollister was 
outstanding for Longmeadow in the discus con- 
test. 

On their home field for the final event, 
Longmeadow competed against Classical and 
Enfield. The Lancers, placing second in this 
meet, successfully ended the track season. 





123 




a 



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124 



FOOTBALL 

For the second straight grid season, the 
Longmeadow High School Lancers pre- 
sented the school and the coaches, Mr. 
Ursprung and Mr. D'Agostino, with a win- 
ning record. This year the team was led 
by Denny Robb and Bob MacDonnell, co- 
captains. 




3 331 

K-9 \9. ga 




r. MORAN, A. MORACE, M. KANA, AND B. KITTREDGE 



125 



M. O'MALLEY AND W. Kl.hMPNHR 




First Row: M. Kana, A. Morace, W. Craft, D. Robb, R. 
MacDonnell, D. Murphy, G. Snyder, B. Kittredge. Second 
Row: A. Robson, T. Moran, C. Cort, B. Doherty, A. Stew- 
art, R. Johnston. Third Row: A. Low, G. Grandison, B. 



Sproul, T. Purdy, W. Howard, D. Moran. Fourth Row: 
P. Brand, W. Sunter, J. Hopkins, J. Searles, L. Stahlberg, 
J. Duval, J. Condon. Fifth Row: Mr. D'Agostino, D. Rich- 
ter, J. Hitz, D. Charlesworth, S. Goldberg, F. Hollister, 
Mr. Ursprung. 



LONGMEADOW 8 COMMERCE 6 

In the first game of the season, Longmeadow 
edged the Red Raiders of Commerce, 8-6. Com- 
merce capitalized on Longo miscues to score 
early in the first period, The try for conversion 
failed. Will Craft and Dick Murphy moved the 




Asst. Coach DAgostino, Co-captains D. Robb 
and R. MacDonnell, Head Coach Ursprung. 



ball up to our 46-yard line where QB Mac- 
Donnell flipped a perfect screen pass to Stewart 
who took it over the shoulder and scampered 54 
yards to the one yard line of Commerce. On 
the next play from scrimmage, full-back Denny 
Robb powered his way through the line for the 
T.D. Stewart carried over for the final two 
points of the afternoon and the margin of vic- 
tory. 

LONGMEADOW 28 LEE 8 

Led by hard-hitting Al Stewart, Longmeadow 
scored three quick touchdowns and then coasted 
to an easy victory over Lee High. Longmeadow 
received the kick-off and marched downfield, 
hitting paydirt on a Bob MacDonnell to Al 
Stewart pass. A pass interception by Doc Cort 
set up the next Longo T.D. as Stewart bulled 
his way up the middle from about the fifteen 
yard line. To add to the thrills, Dale Richter 
intercepted a pitchout in Lee's backfield and 
sped forty yards to a touchdown. Snyder and 
Robb added the conversions and Longmeadow 
enjoyed a comfortable 22-0 yead at the end of 
the first half. Bob MacDonnell scored the final 
touchdown in the fourth period, sweeping 
around the end for ten yards. 



126 



LONGMEADOW 8 LUDLOW 28 



On October 10, a powerful Ludlow team 
caught fire and recorded a come-from-behind 
victory. The heavily favored Ludlow Lions had 
many anxious moments before checking the 
Longmeadow defense for its scores. The Lancer 
eleven outplayed them during the first half, 
keeping the ball deep in Ludlow territory, scor- 
ing once, and threatening on several other oc- 
casions. Longo took the lead early in the second 
quarter as flanker Snyder swept around the end 
for seven yards and six points. Al Stewart, who 
played brilliantly, averaging about eight yards 
per carry, followed for the conversion. Ludlow 
made the lead short-lived as they broke through 
for all their points during the second half. 





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127 



LONGMEADOW 8 ENFIELD 6 

A hard-hitting Longmeadow line led by Al 
Robson, Jim Duval, and line backer Tim Purdy 
blocked and tackled Longmeadow to an 8-6 
thriller over powerful Enfield High. The pre- 
viously undefeated and three-touchdown favo- 
rite, Green Raiders, expected an easy afternoon. 
What they didn't count on, however, was an 
underweighted but spirited Lancer forward 
wall. The Raiders drew first blood, scoring 
early in the third period. But the Lancers took 
the kick and Al Stewart drove downfield pick- 
ing up good yardage. Stewart finally blasted 
over from about the three. MacDonnell carried 
the ball on a quarterback sneak for the conver- 
sion and what proved to be the margin of vic- 
tory. In the last ninety seconds, the Nutmeggers 
had seven stabs at the goal line from within the 
Longo 4-yard line. 



I I 












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LONGMEADOW 20 CLASSICAL 24 

On a beautiful Indian summer day, a capacity 
crowd of over 2,000 spirited fans watched the 
most exciting game of the year as the Long- 
meadow Lancers were edged by their arch-rival, 
the Classical Bulldogs, 24-20. 

Classical pulled away 16-0, but the Lancers 
took hold and fought back to close the margin. 
Stewart carried over from about the 3-yard line, 
but the all-important extra point try by Taylor 
failed as he fumbled. With less than a minute 
left in the first half and with the Lancers on 
the 4 5 -yard line of Classical, quarterback Bob 
MacDonnell and flanker Glenn Snyder combined 
for the play of the year. "Mac" rolled far to his 
right, emerged from a flock of would-be Classi- 
cal tacklers and flipped a beautiful roll-out pass 



to Glenn, who had outraced the secondary. Sny- 
der took the ball over the shoulder in perfect 
stride and walked over for the score. The 
Lancers found themselves on the short end of 
a 16-12 score at half time. 

The fired-up Lancers then took the second 
half kick-off and drove seventy yards for their 
third touchdown with Bob MacDonnell going 
over from the 10-yard line on a quarterback 
sneak. With minutes remaining, Classical pulled 
a long shot and won a run good for sixty-five 
yards to the 2-yard line of Longmeadow. They 
scored on the next series of downs. The game 
ended with a final Lancer drive, stalled on 
Classical's 10-yard line. The backfield was 
sparked by Al Stewart and Bob MacDonnell; in 
the line, Barry Kittredge, Jim Duval, and Andy 
Morace gave outstanding performances. 





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VARSITY SOCCER 







* . *» 



First Row: P. Collins, D. Baird, R. Kimball, M. Mazer, 
N. Cummings, B. Edgerly, J. Mayock, J. Merrill, J. Kaiser, 
B. Simons, D. Volk. Second Row: B. Babb, B. Ferris, T. 



Paige, R. Hoflf, J. Eaton, J. Deely, N. Markson, R. Margolis, 
T. Astaldi. Third Row: Mr. Climo, Mr. Dugay, B. Anderson, 
J. Poole, B. Aldrich, G. Gibson, C. Clark, E. Flagler, J. 
Tufts, D. Purrington, M. Palmer, Mr. Suher. 



SOCCER 



SOCCER SCORES 



Longmeadow 2 


Trade 


1 


Longmeadow 1 


Suffield 


2 


Longmeadow 6 


Chicopee 





Longmeadow 2 


Monson 





Longmeadow 


Suffield 


2 


Longmeadow 


Ludlow 


1 


Longmeadow 2 


W. Springfield 





Longmeadow 3 


Chicopee 





Longmeadow 2 


Holyoke 





Longmeadow 1 


Classical 


1 


Longmeadow 1 


Monson 





Longmeadow 1 


Ludlow 


2 


Longmeadow 


Tech 


5 


Longmeadow 3 


W. Springfield 


1 


Longmeadow 2 


Tech 


1 


Longmeadow 1 


Classical 







VARSITY SOCCER CAPTAINS 

B. Edgerly and N. Cummings 



129 




FRESHMAN SOCCER 

First Row: A. Bloom, G. Gibbons, R. Hitchins, D. Jenny, D- Kimball, S. Fox, R. Cohen. Sec- 
ond Row: W. O'Malley, T. Lawton, J. Sickel, C. Smith, R. Cowles, D. Streeter, C. Carter, F. 
Kraft, G. Clark, J. Sickel, G. Wess, Mr. Climo. 






-■ H 




D. BAIRD 




M. PALMER 




Front Row: J. Tufts and C. Hollister. 

Back Row: T. Astaldi, R. Kimball, and M. Mazer. 




E. FLAGLER, B. ALDRICH AND C. CLARK 



130 



The 1959 soccer season was highlighted 
by many outstanding games, among which 
were victories over rival Classical, Tech, 
Monson, and West Springfield. Although 
the Longos suffered only three defeats in 
Western Massachusetts competition, two of 
these were in Pioneer Valley Soccer League 
contests to defending champion Ludlow. 
Two more of the team's total of five losses 
were to Suffield, its Connecticut division 
champion. 

In its league, Longmeadow virtually 
trounced every team but the champion Lud- 
low, to whom the Longos lost 1-0 and 2-1. 
In the first match, Ludlow triumphed on a 
fluke goal that dribbled off one of Long- 
meadow's own defenders. In the second, a 
thriller to the last second, the Lancers, who 
had been leading by one goal up to the last 
minute and a half, lost their chance for the 
championship. Two goals, one a freak pen- 
alty shot and the other a shot off a Long- 
meadow player, won the game for Ludlow 
after a tremendous fight by both teams. 




3 





■HHRnHHI 




A revenge game against Tech, who had 
previously whipped the Longos 5-0, pro- 
vided another special for the 1959 season. 
Longmeadow used its latent scorer, John 
Mayock, to sink two goals in a 2-1 victory. 
Counting earlier wins over Trade and Com- 
merce, Longmeadow had beaten almost as 
many city teams as had the champion, Clas- 
sical. 

The most spectacular game of the season 
was a one goal victory over Classical, 



131 



Springfield's City Champions. Led by goalie 
Mike Palmer, the Longmeadow defense kept 
Classical at bay, until the superb offense 
finally hustled its way to the winning goal, 
scored by Ned Cummings in the last ten 
seconds of a double overtime period. The 
victory served as a fitting conclusion to the 
season for a group of well deserving seniors: 
Charlie Clark, Ricky Kimball, Mike Mazer, 
Ed Flagler, Mike Palmer, and Skip Baird, 
and especially for the winning coach, Mr. 
Suher. Although Longmeadow had not 
been chosen for the Western Massachusetts 
Championship, it showed that it had enough 
ability to beat a participating member, Clas- 
sical. 

Outstanding in making Longmeadow's 
overall record of ten wins, five losses, and 
one tie were Pioneer Valley All-Stars Brian 
Edgerly, Dave Purrington, Mike Palmer, 
Skip Baird, and Phil Collins. Edgerly and 
Purrington were also selected for All- 
Western Massachusetts Honors, while Brian 
received the greatest recognition, being 




40 



..,- _.jA .-.-*' - ; _jr -_ ' _ 




chosen as the outstanding player in this 
area. 

Although the Lancers will miss the depth 
provided by the graduating seniors, the next 
year's team seems even more potent than 
this year's victorious clan. With the ma- 
jority of this year's starters returning, the 
Longos appear to be the choice to cop the 
next Pioneer Valley League Championship, 
and perhaps even the Championship of 
Western Massachusetts. 



132 




BASKETBALL 





SEASON 


RECORD 








Longmeadow 56 


Enfield 


29 


Longmeadow 


66 


Enfield 


40 


Longmeadow 56 


Ludlow 


48 


Longmeadow 


64 


Commerce 


41 


Longmeadow 69 


Palmer 


49 


Longmeadow 


73 


Somers 


41 


Longmeadow 54 


Commerce 


35 


Longmeadow 


54 


Classical 


69 


Longmeadow 82 


Somers 


43 


Longmeadow 


51 


Easthampton 


41 


Longmeadow 75 


Stafford Springs 


47 


Longmeadow 


65 


Ludlow 


63 


Longmeadow 43 


Classical 


41 


Longmeadow 


68 


Easthampton 


58 



The 1959-1960 Lancer cage team, aided by Coach Has- 
kell, surpassed the exceptional records of the past three 
years with a sparkling 13-1 card. Using their patented fast 
break, the Lancers outscored their opponents 873 to 642, 
an average of 62.4 to 45.8 a game. 

The Lancers were led by 5' 11" freshman Jimmy Wall- 
ing who finished the regular season with 300 points and 
an impressive average of 21 points a game. Walling, who 
seemed to get better as the season progressed, used an 
assortment of drives, a fading jump shot, a colorful hook, 
and accurate foul shooting to stimy the opposition. Glenn 
Snyder wrapped up his fourth varsity year as the team's 
second highest scorer with 230 points, or 15 per game. 
Considering all the skills of basketball — shooting, passing, 
dribbling, rebounding, and playing defense — the most 



valuable player and unsung hero of the Lancers was 6'1" 
junior Ned Cummings. Countless times Ned passed off to 
teammates Walling and Snyder, enabling them to sink a 
bushel of points. Longmeadow's center, Dale Richter, a 
springy 6' 3" junior, and Dick Murphy, a 6'1" senior, 
who both averaged seven points a game, rounded out the 
starting five. Longmeadow's sixth man, Will Craft at 
6'2 1 / />" rotated effectively at center and forward. No good 
team is complete without a strong bench. Seniors Tom 
Astaldi, Bob MacDonnell, and Ed Flagler, and underclass- 
men Gary Gibson, and Al Stewart assisted ably. 

The return of three starters, a good bench, and another 
fine J.V. team from which to draw — all point to another 
great team next year. 



sovgo 




It*-*. 




Front Row: T. Astaldi, D. Murphy, A. Stewart, G. Snyder, and D. Richter, B. 

J. Walling. Second Row: B. Anderson, E. Flagler, G. Gibson, Coach Haskell. 



Craft, N. Cummings, B. MacDonnell, anc 



133 




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L 1 -1 1 



JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL 



First Row: K. Lang, T. Harrelson, P. DelVecchio, P. Josselyn, B. Ferris, J. Pool , F. Hollister, T. Clark, S. Mac- 

Brand, J. Hopkins, J. Deely, T. Paige. Second Row: Mr. Inryre, J. Harten, M. Kaplan, J. Kaiser, S. Wellman. 



Under the able coaching of Mr. Josselyn, the 
J.V. basketball team completed the season with 
an impressive eleven win, five loss record. Jeff 
Hopkins, John Harten, Jim Poole, Peter Brand, 



Tom Clarke, and Paul DelVecchio were the 
top rebounders and scorers. The all-sophomore 
J.V. team gained experience this year that will 
prove valuable in future seasons. 




FRESHMEN BASKETBALL 

First Row; A. Bloom, R. Hitchins, C. Long, C. Parker, Suher, D. Hartford, R. Cowles, S. Parker, R. Cohen, T. 

C. Gibbons, R. Wood, and C. McKee. Second Row: Mr. Lawton, N. Whitehead, and H. Poole. 



The freshman team, coached by Mr. Suher, 
ended the basketball season with a three win 
and nine loss record. Bob Cohen, Dee Hartford, 



and Steve Parker were the outstanding perform- 
ers of the team. With a little more height and 
experience, this group promises to have a win- 
ning J.V. record. 



135 



In the opening contest of the season, the 
Lancers captured a first quarter lead of 17-0 and 
then coasted to an easy 56-29 victory over En- 
field High. Jimmy Walling led the balanced at- 
tack with eighteen points. 

In their next encounter, the Lancers tallied a 
needed twenty points in the fourth quarter to 
defeat a strong Ludlow team, 56-48. Walling, 
with 21, and Snyder, with 15, starred for LHS. 

Sparked by a 31 point final quarter and the 
27 point performance of Jimmy Walling, 
Longmeadow handed Palmer High a 69-49 
defeat. Clutch shooting by Snyder, Walling, and 
Murphy helped to turn what was a close tilt 
into a rout. 

After an unsteady first quarter, Longmeadow 
took hold and then rolled to another easy 
victory, 54-35, over Commerce High. 

After a break for vacation, the Lancers trav- 
eled to Somers where they romped to an 82-43 
victory. Forward Jimmy Walling set a new 
school record as he bombed 33 points in a bril- 
liant shooting exhibition. 

The next victim, Stafford Springs, succumbed 
easily to the Lancers, 75-47. 

Although they were unbelievably cold, the 
Longmeadow team used some pinpoint shooting 
from the charity line to stay within reach and 
finally won a thriller from our arch-rival, Classi- 
cal, 43-41. Junior Dale Richter was an invalu- 
able aid under the boards and Cummings and 
Snyder led the scorers. 

Once again, the Longos charged to a large 
half-time lead and then coasted to a 66-40 win 




over Enfield. Walling and Snyder paced the 
offense with 24 and 14 points, respectively. 

A red-hot first quarter gave the Red Raiders 
of Commerce, eager for an upset, a short-lived 
advantage before they succumbed to the Lanc- 
ers, 64-41. Will Craft and Dale Richter domin- 
ated the boards as our scoring twins, Walling 
and Snyder, contributed a total of 42 markers. 




136 





LHS seized a large first quarter margin of 
27-6 over Somers and then rolled home for 
their tenth straight win, 73-41. Good team 
work and fine passing helped Walling and Sny- 
der lead the. attack with 23 and 18 points. 

At the Springfield College Field House, de- 
termined Classical used its own radar to spoil 
Longmeadow's victory streak. A crowd of 2,000 
saw the Lancers lead for most of the first half 
and then throw up an assortment of defenses, 
none of which came close to containing the 
Classical team. The Bulldogs, who started hot 
and stayed hot through 32 minutes of basket- 
ball, bombed away for a terrific percentage 
from the floor to shatter the Lancers 69-54. 

The Lancers hopped back onto the victory 
wagon as they beat Easthampton High, 51-41. 
The rebounding of Richter and the clutch shoot- 
ing of Dick Murphy helped to turn what was 
a close game into an easy win. 

Jimmy Walling's hook shot with one second 
left was enough to give the Lancers a well- 
earned win over the Ludlow Lions, 65-63. Wall- 
ing, who stole the show, drove hard and used 
accurate foul shooting to stretch the twines for 
32 markers. Snyder, who scored 14 points, and 
Richter and Craft, who cleared the boards, 
aided the team in its win. 

Longmeadow ended its regular season with 
a 68-58 victory over Easthampton. Longmeadow 
was never in trouble after the first quarter and 
led by four baskets at intermission. Fabulous 
Jimmy Walling once again sparked the Longos 
with 30 points. However, game honors went to 
Easthampton's center, who sank an unbelievable 
21 out of 22 charity tosses to prevent the 
game from being a rout. Richter and Snyder, 
each with 12 points, followed up the Lancer 
attack. 





Jy'- 



SMALL SCHOOL 
TOURNAMENT 

For the third consecutive year, 
Longmeadow has had the honor 
of being invited to the Western 
Massachusetts Small School Tour- 
nament; and for the second year, 
the Lancers were edged in a low 
scoring finale. Longmeadow's first 
victim, Saint Joseph's, succumbed 
easily to a fourth quarter onslaught 
when the Lancers threw in 26 
points to record an easy 56-41 vic- 
tory. On the second night, Jimmy 
Walling's 30 points sparked an 
overall team effort as the Lancers 
used a 40 point second half to roll 
over strong Saint Mary's, 67-50. 

This victory earned the pre-tour- 
nament favorite Lancers the right 
to oppose Amherst Regional in the 
finals. The Hurricanes pulled one 
of the year's biggest upsets as they 
shocked Longmeadow 46-39- Al- 
though the Lancers lost in the fi- 
nals, they deserve much credit for 
the fine show of basketball skill and 
sportsmanship that was displayed 
throughout all three games. 




138 




HOCKEY 



The Longmeadow High 1959-1960 hockey 
team failed to retain its Suburban League 
crown, bowing out only by a slim one point 
margin on the last day of the season to a strong 
Chicopee High six. Leading the Lancers to 
their excellent 11-3-2 record were junior co- 
captains Phil Collins and Brian Edgerly. Seniors 
Bill Toner, Skip Baird, Jim Tufts, Jay Wiley, 
and Bob Summersgill also aided Longmeadow's 
hockey squad to compile its impressive record. 
Individual performances by Skip Baird and 
Brian Edgerly, who ran second and third with 
31 and 29 points, respectively, in the league 
scoring race, kept the Lancer puckmen on top 
for most of the season. 

In post season selections, Brian and Skippy 
were both awarded front-line positions on the 



Suburban All-Star Team. Defenseman Dave 
Purrington earned a place on the second string 
of the All-Stars. With a return of five of the 
six starters and a strong bench for support, 
Coach Ness looks forward to an even brighter 
season next year. 



HOCKEY SCORES 




Longmeadow 


3 


Holyoke 


1 


Longmeadow 


3 


Chicopee 


2 


Longmeadow 


2 


Agawam 


2 


Longmeadow 


9 


Westfield 


2 


Longmeadow 


3 


Holyoke 


6 


Longmeadow 


4 


Chicopee 


3 


Longmeadow 


5 


Agawam 


1 


Longmeadow 


6 


Westfield 


1 


Longmeadow 


1 


Holyoke 


4 


Longmeadow 


1 


Chicopee 


6 


Longmeadow 


9 


Agawam 


1 


Longmeadow 


3 


Westfield 





Longmeadow 


5 


Holyoke 


4 


Longmeadow 


3 


Chicopee 


3 


Longmeadow 


6 


Agawam 


1 


Longmeadow 


7 


Westfield 


1 



• «yit m m m» 







VARSITY HOCKEY 



First Row: B. Sproul, F. Kraft, P. Collins, J. Wiley, 
P. Clarke, J. Gould, D. Purrington, J Bottone. Second Row: 



Mr. Ryder, B. Edgerly, S. Baird, R. Moran, J. Mayock, J. 
Wickstead, D. Streeter, B. Summersgill, B. Toner, J. Tufts, 
C. Carter, Mr. Ness. 



139 




HOCKEY CAPTAINS 

B. Edgerly and P. Collins 



SENIOR HOCKEY TEAM MEMBERS 

J. Gould, J. Wiley, B. Summersgill, J. Tufts, D. Baird and B. Toner. 





The Lancer puckmen started the season off 
with an impressive 3-1 victory over Holyoke. 
Hustling Brian Edgerly led the attack with two 
goals and Peter Clarke chipped in with the 
third. In their second game, the Lancers scored 
three quick goals and then starved off Chicopee 
for a 3-2 victory. Once again, Edgerly and 
Clarke contributed the goals. A poor Agawam 
team surprised the Longos in their next en- 
counter by holding them to a 2-2 tie. This tie 
eventually cost the Lancers a state tournament 
berth and the league championship. Having re- 
cuperated, Longmeadow crushed an under- 
manned Westfield team, 9-2. This game was 
highlighted by Skip Baird's four goals. The 



140 



Lancers sustained their first loss of the season at 
the hands of a hustling Holyoke team, 6-3. The 
Lancers recovered in the next tilt, however, to 
skate away with another squeaker over Chico- 
pee, 4-3. The next two games were written off 
as LHS wins as the Lancer puckmen recorded 
impressive victories, defeating Agawam and 
Westfield respectively 5-1 and 6-1. 

Longmeadow's dreams of the championship 
were shattered on successive Wednesdays as 
both Holyoke and Chicopee administered con- 
vincing setbacks to the Lancers, 4-1 and 6-1. 
Longmeadow took hold in their next game and 
were never headed as they crushed Agawam, 9-1. 
This tremendous offensive display featured a 
"hat-trick" by Skip Baird. Holyoke High suc- 
cumbed to the Jet and White, 4-3, in a game 
highlighted by hard checking and aggressive 
play. The Lancers finished the season strong as 
they battled Chicopee High to a tense 3-3 tie 
and then rolled over Agawam and Westfield 
6-1 and 7-1. 











GOLF TEAM 

Mr. Haskell, T. Rachele, L. Price, J. Gould, N. Day, 
R. Bueker, Z. Mirkin, P. Collins, and J. Nannen. 



GOLF 



The Longmeadow golf team, coached by Mr. Haskell, 
finished the season with a winning five and four record. 
Zane Mirkin was high point winner, followed by Jim 
Gould and Neil Day. The other members of the team, 
who contributed greatly, were Jim Nannen, Russ Phe- 
lon, Ralph Rachele, Phil Collins, and Dick Bueker. The 
majority of last year's team will be returning this spring, 
more experienced and hopeful of another fine season. 



Longmeadow 6 V2 

Longmeadow 1 1 V2 

Longmeadow 8 

Longmeadow 1 6 

Longmeadow 8 

Longmeadow 1 1 

Longmeadow 7 

Longmeadow 1 3 Vi 

Longmeadow 18 



GOLF SCORES 

Ludlow 8 1/2 
Commerce 3V2 
Classical 10 
Ludlow 22 
Classical 1 
Commerce 4 
Westfield 8 
Westfield 1 1/2 
Trade 





142 



N.DAY 



J. GOULD 



P. COLLINS 



T 
E 

N 
N 
I 
S 




TENNIS 
Mr. Lopes, T. Purdy, H. Nannen, J. Guidette. 



The Longmeadow netmen ended their season 
with a six win, one loss, and one tie record. 
Jeff Guidette, who was seeded as first man, led 
the team to its successful season. Tim Purdy 



and Ed Salva also showed impressive perform- 
ances. Highlights of the season for the tennis 
team, coached by Mr. Lopes, included victories 
over Technical High and Easthampton. 



BOWLING 

The Longmeadow High School bowlers 
ended the season with a 3 win and 7 loss record. 
Outstanding performances by Sam Rickless and 
Mike Parker, who compiled scores of 137 and 
134, respectively, highlighted the games of the 
season. Among significant wins for the team 
was the season's last game with its arch-rival 
Classical. 




143 



BOWLING 

Front Row: D. Christensen, M. Parker, and S. Barowsky 
Back Row: S. Rickless and J. Christensen. 




First Row: J. Mohrman, D. Mohrman, M. Clark, C. Mor- 
ner, M. Garrels, B. Chapin, S. Wagner, N. Frost, M. Wes- 
sendorf, B. Russell, B. Milner, E. Giustina. Second Row: 
C. Almgren, C. Beaver, C. Moyer, L. Wright, C. Morris, 



B. Hinkson, C. Carlson, K. Moakler, M. Hobart, C. Bisesti, 
E. Swain, P. Keeney, D. Knaus. Third Row; P. Bates, L. 
Flint, D. Howland, G. Gustafson, E. Dierauf, S. Martin, 
M. Krein, D. Wiley, C. Avery. 



DRILL TEAM 



The 1959-1960 Drill Team, led by captain 
Barbara Chapin and co-captain Sally Wagner, 
is congratulated for the unique performances 
which they have given at the home football 
and basketball games. This year, the Drill 
Team was honored for its outstanding exhibi- 
tions by being invited to march at Springfield 
College before a group of instructors from 
various Springfield schools which were con- 
templating the formation of their own drill 
teams. The girls were also asked to perform on 
television in a preview of its Small School Bas- 
ketball Tournament halftime show. The Drill 
Team and its coach, Miss Kelsey, well deserve 
these honors for all the many hours which they 
spend in perfecting their spirited drills. 




144 




Front Row: P. Ciciarelli, C. Young, P. Penney, G. Dow, 



and A. Evans. Second Row: S. Shaw, S. Baldwin, J. Bloom, 
A. Leers, and B. Anas. 




CHEERLEADERS 



Our vivacious cheerleaders, captained by 
Ginny Dow, sparked our teams on to victory. 
Good sportsmanship, for which Longmeadow 
High School is noted, was exhibited with pep, 
precision, and versatility by these girls. We are 
proud of our cheerleaders in their stylish kilts 
and are grateful to them for promoting school 
spirit. 



145 



<' i. 




LEADERS' CLUB 

First Row: M. O'Malley, P. Ciciarelli, V. Dow, J. Childs, E. Dierauf, B. Chapin, S. Shaw, 
J. Mohrman, R. Murphy. Second Row: Miss Kelsey, S. Shatz, S. Wagner, S. Baldwin, C. Morner, 
D. Howland, P. Barnes, N. Frost, B. Milner, J. Gould, Mr. D'Agostino. Third Row: D. Robb, 
R. Kimball, A. Stewart, B. Edgerly, D. Richter, R. MacDonnell, T. Astaldi, W. Cox, M. Mazer. 



LEADERS' CLUB 

The 1959-1960 Boys and Girls Leaders' Club has worked to fulfill its 
obligation to the school by assisting during physical education classes and 
after-school activities. 

The second annual Sock Hop, held in November, was one of the most 
successful events of the year. The trampoline and the volleyball and the bad- 
minton courts attracted many students and teachers to the old gym. Meanwhile, 
there was dancing to records in the new gym. This Sock Hop provided the 
money necessary to finance activities during the year. 

The training received by the members of Leaders' Club, under the able 
supervision of Miss Kelsey and Mr. D'Agostino, will be of great value to all 
concerned. Much credit goes to these student leaders and faculty advisors for 
the time and effort they have devoted to make the entire sports' program a 
success. 



146 



GIRLS' ATHLETIC PROGRAM 




GIRLS' FIELD HOCKEY 



First Row: J. Mohrman, B. Milner, B. Anas, P. Penney, 
C. Paige, S. Baldwin, S. Wagner, P. Craft, N. Frost, A. 
McCullough, S. Bocchino, P. Ciciarelli. Second Row: Miss 



Kelsey, D. Howland, D. Knaus, J. Ahern, P. Keeney, V. 
Dow, C. Avery, M. Krein, E. Dierauf, G. Gustafson, D. 
Pratt, C. Carlson, W. Ronaldson, C. Morris, R. Harten, 
E. Swain. 



FIELD HOCKEY 

On November 6, the girls' field hockey team 
attended a playday at MacDuffie School for 
Girls. The first team lost by a score of 3-0, but 
the second squad came up with a startling 1-0 
victory. The next playday was held at Minne- 
chaug Regional High School on November 12. 
After a spirited contest from both teams, the 
game ended in a 2-2 tie. Despite the losses, this 
was an enjoyable experience, promoting inter- 
school fellowship. 








147 



■ 

li 



<•><-• r><*» 





r I 

WHITE TEAM BASKETBALL 

First Row: B. Anas, S. Albano, N. Frost, P. Andrews, son, D. Howland, E. Dierauf, C. Hayes, M. Mulkerin, L. 

P. Thomas, P. Penney. Second Row: K. Moakler, C. Carl- Harkless. 





WHITE TEAM VOLLEYBALL 

First Row: E. Gilmour, S. Gurland, C. Avery, C. Morris, Second Row: N. Hilsinger, C. Carlson, D. Howland, 

B. Anas, P. Penney. E. Dierauf, J. Childs, M. Krein, B. Hinkson. 




JET TEAM VOLLEYBALL 

First Row: E. Giustina, A. McCullough, C. Paige, J. Second Row: S. Shaw, P. Nettleton, G. Gustafson, B. 

Leers, P. Barnes. Chapin, L. Pratt, M. Katten. 




JET TEAM BASKETBALL 
First Row: B. Russell, P. Barnes, S. Wagner, C. Young, Second Row: S. Baldwin, D. Wiley, G. Gustafson, B. 



148 p. Ciciarelli, J. Summersgill. 



Chapin, M. Weisman, R. Alstrom. 



VOLLEYBALL AND 
BASKETBALL 



GIRLS' SPORTS NIGHT 



Girls, wishing to perfect skills learned in 
gym class, were given the opportunity to par- 
ticipate in volleyball and basketball intramurals 
which were held after school. Both the volley- 
ball and basketball tournaments were won by 
the Jet Team. The climax of these sports was 
the competition between the Jet and White All- 
Star teams at Girls' Sport Night. 




rs O! 



WHITE 
TEAM 






149 




.-■•t •:.■.*:•■•.■. ■••■•.•.•:•.•.•.••••.•.•••••■•■•.•■•••■■■•■•.•••■ ■•.•/i'.-' Vi'i • • v • • * " -** 




The Masacksic staff is deeply indebted to our patrons 
and advertisers. Without their assistance, this book 
could not have become a reality. 



Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
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Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Dr. and Mrs. 
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Dr. and Mrs. 
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Dr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Dr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 



Lewis E. Abrams 
Robert R. Ackley 
Norman J. Adams 
William Adams, Jr. 
Arnold Adiletti 
H. P. Almgren 
Theodore Anas 
John M. Anderson 
Walter E. Anderson 
Arthur A. Arnold, Jr. 
Stanley Asinof 
Frank T. Astaldi 
Edgar Atkinson 
Robert Avery 
John Baird 
W. H. Baldwin 
Thomas L. Barker 
Wayne C. Barnes 
Gilbert W. Baron 
Ethan D. Bassett 
Joseph D. Bates, Jr. 
Paul F. Beaver 
Robert H. Benton 
Joseph I. Bernstein 
Paul Biondi 
Dominick T. Bisesti 
S. Prestley Blake 
Bernard Bloom 
Paul Bloom 
Michael E. Bocchino 
Theodore Brand 
John E. Breglio 
Robert M. Brigham 
Paul Broman 



Mr. and Mrs. Frederick P. Brouwer 

Dr. and Mrs. Rolf Buchdahl 

Mrs. Elizabeth Bullions 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Everett Carlson 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Carroll ' 

Dr. and Mrs. Parker C. Carson 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles William Carter 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel F. Carville 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Casal 

Mr. and Mrs. James R. Chandler, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Homer N. Chapin 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank M. Chereskin 

Mr. and Mrs. David G. Christensen 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Ciciarelli 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Cimini 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Glen Clark 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Clarke 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Clark 

Dr. and Mrs. William Coen 

Mr. and Mrs. Myer Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Henry Cone 

Mr. and Mrs. William V. Cook 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Corcoran 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Cordis 

Mr. and Mrs. Royce A. Cort 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Lawrence Cort 

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Craft 

Mrs. W. Emerson Craig 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Cummings 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell B. Day 

Mr. and Mrs. John W: Deely 

Mr. and Mrs. Augusto DelVecchio 

Mr. and Mrs. Curtis J. Dierauf 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph I. Doherty 



152 



Mr. and Mrs. David L. Dondy 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Dow 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Downton 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Doyle 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. DuBuisson 
Mr. and Mrs. Benn R. Eckstein 
Mr. and Mrs. Douglass N. Ellis 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Felio 
Major and Mrs. V. W. Ferguson 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Flint 
Mr. and Mrs. Reid G. Fordyce 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. Frisbie 
Mr. and Mrs. John C. Garrels, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Linus A. Gavin 
Mr. and Mrs. Allan Gilmour 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur D. Giustina 
Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Gold 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert H. Goldstein 
Mr. and Mrs. James J. Gould, Sr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard E. Greenwell 
Mr. and Mrs. James H. Guernsey 
Mr. and Mrs. Y. A. Gustafson 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Harrelson 
Mr. and Mrs. John T. Harten 
Dr. and Mrs. Louis E. Hathaway, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Donald Hayes 
Mr. and Mrs. William Henschke 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Hernberg 
Mr. and Mrs. F. S. Hilsinger 
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Hinkson 
Mr. and Mrs. Russell C. Hitz 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Hodskins 
Mr. and Mrs. Hudson Holland 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Hollister, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard N. Holter 

Mr. and Mrs. I. A. Hopkins 

Mr. and Mrs. William Hoppe 

Mrs. Foster A. Howland 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Kamp 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Kana 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Karcz 

Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Katten 

Mr. and Mrs. William K. Kaynor, Jr. 

Mr. George C Keady, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Clayton Keiser 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald E. Keith 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving S. Kimball 

Mrs. Max Kittredge 

Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Klempner 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur P. Knaus 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kranzusch 

Mr. and Mrs. Gustave A. Krein 

Mr. and Mrs. Kurt R. Krohne 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lanciaux 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred W. Lang 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd P. Langevin 

Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Lanyon 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Larson 

Mr. and Mrs. William Lawrence 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore S. Lawton 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Leers 

Atty. Herbert Lerner 

Dr. and Mrs. Raymond S. Licht 

Mrs. Allan W. Low 

Mr. and Mrs. Rene G. Lucier 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Allan MacDonnell 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd C. MacGregor 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Marcuson 



153 



Mr. and Mrs. Manoog H. Markarian 
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Markson 
Mr. and Mrs. James R. Martin 
Dr. and Mrs. M. Mazer 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. McCullough 
Mrs. Madilene G. Mclntyre 
Dr. and Mrs. H. N. Memery 
Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Merriam 
Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Miller, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Milner 
Mr. and Mrs. Ted Milton, Sr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold L. Mitchell 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Moran 
Mr. and Mrs. William H. Moran 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Mohrman 
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon C. Mount 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Moyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Mulkerin 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard W. Nannen 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred E. Neef 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth F. Newell 
Mr. and Mrs. Merritt S. Norton 
Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Nye 
Mr. and Mrs. C. A. O'Connor 
Mr. and Mrs. W. M. O'Malley 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel R. Page 
Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Paige 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin L. Parker 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Patton, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Penney 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Pool 
Dr. and Mrs. Gordon C. Pratt 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Puffer 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Reilly 
Mr. and Mrs. Quentin Reynolds 
Mr. and Mrs. Hayes Rickless 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. Robb 
Mr. and Mrs. William Rose 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. Routson 

Dr. and Mrs. Alexander B. Russell 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth F. Ryder 

Mr. and Mrs. Bertram Shatz 

Mrs. and Mrs. Spencer W. Shaw 

Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Shepard 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Sproul 

Mr. and Mrs. William Stewart 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Stockman, Jr. 

Mrs. Raymond H. Strople 

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Summersgill 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Sunter 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar M. Swain 

Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Talbot 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. Ten Broeck 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Terry 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester I. Thomas 

Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Tincknell 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Toner 

Mrs. M. B. Trumbull 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Tufts 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Twohig 

Mr. and Mrs. D. J. Vignone 

Mrs. Eugene P. Wagner 

Major and Mrs. William Waiksnoris 

Mr. and Mrs. Mack F. Wallace 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Walter 

Dr. and Mrs. Ruel Ward 

Dr. and Mrs. Jacob Weisman 

Mr. and Mrs. David Weiss 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy E. Wessendorf 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Lawrence White 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett W. Whitehead 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred E. Wiley 

Dr. and Mrs. William Wright 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Wood 

Mr. Edward H. Zinn 



154 



W^*^-i^'-&'*&^^<^v^<>^^<^v^-'^^<-0^^-<-0^<'^<S?~-<-^<^^<^-<^^i^ 



LORING STUDIO 



OFFICIAL YEARBOOK PHOTOGRAPHER 



§ 



@> 



83 WORTHINGTON STREET 



SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



GEORGE AVAKIAN 
Representative 



X^'-^'^'-^'-<^-<-<^''-^'<-<^'.^'-^<<^.<^'--^'<^.^ 



155 



Xi^*^<<^ t -<£ ;> *4^<^<*5*>V^-<^<45*><^<<^ 



ENFIELD LUMBER CO., INC 

THOMPSONVILLE, CONN. 

Telephone Springfield 
REpublic 3-6684 



Best Wishes and Good Luck to the 
CLASS OF I960 

from the 

ALBERT T. WOOD POST 175 

AMERICAN LEGION 




IC€ CR€flfTl 
SHOPS 




X:?^^!<^.^X^C^V?^^<45^5 > V^<^ : - 1 £>T<^<<$^tf > ^ 



156 






RIVERSIDE PARK 

Route 5 -A 
AGAWAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

Playground of the Connecticut Valley 



i 

? 
1 



§ 

§ 





Compliments of 




YERRALL & YERRALL 


BLAKE'S 


REAL ESTATE & INSURANCE 


AT THE "X" 


44 Vernon Street 
Springfield, Massachusetts 




Specializing in sale of 




residential property in 


Your Family Shopping Center 


Springfield and its suburbs 


with all the 


Longmcadow representatives: 


MRS. HELEN H. SEAHURY 


Famous Brands 


160 Westmoreland Avenue 




Longmcadow, Massachusetts 




MRS. MATTHEW J. BACHULUS 




33 Tcabord Dr. 




Longmcadow, Massachusetts 



^.jy'.j^.^^.yy.yy.jy'.'jC^.j^.^r.^'^^.jy'''^ 



157 






Tel. REpublic2-1151 

GEORGE W. MORISI 

Complete Insurance Service 

120 MAPLE STREET 

Springfield 5, Mass. 

Morisi Insurance Agency 



| Beauty Shop on the Green 



§ 

§ 
§ 

§ 
§ 

§ 



Josephine M. Piepul, Prop. 
9 CHANDLER AVENUE 

Cor. Chandler Ave. & Longmeadow St. 
Longmeadow, Mass. 

Tel. LO 7-5643 

Instant Hair Dryers 



DA LE BF1Q5 



Tel. REpublic 6-5491 

472 UNION STREET 

Springfield, Massachusetts 



MORAN SALES CO., INC. 

1264 UNION STREET 

West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Tel. REpublic 3-5 137 
White — Auto Car — Jeep 






-.<^^^ < ^(*^V^'-^^^<^'<-<^'-<^t*^^^'-^<>^<-<^'-<^<^ t -<^ 



158 



9 $ 



Compliments 
of 

FEDERAL TEA CO. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



§ 

§ 
§ 



%O r ^-Cr-'-Cr- f ^r^r.'^0^-'-<^^-Cr-'^^'-^'-<y- , -Cr--^/'-^^-'^'---</--'-Cr-^O'-^^ 



Compliments of 

SPRINGFIELD OFFSET 
& PRINTING CO., INC 

44 TAYLOR STREET 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



Telephone 

ST 2-0771— ST 2-0421 

HOLLAND, INC. 

Color TV App., Hi-Fi 
C. Holland — E. A. Bednarz 

159 BOSTON ROAD 

Springfield, Massachusetts 



TOM'S 
Atlantic Service Station 

BLISS and WILLIAMS 

Proprietor: Tom Oswald 

Telephone LO 7-7596 



159 



X5 > *-<^' < <^"- <?0 v5 i ^e^t<^<v^<<^t<pv^.c^^ 



WEDDING & BIRTHDAY CAKES 



n! 



CAKES - P ASTRIES 

"The Lar'gest Assortment of Donuts in 
Springfield" 





Main Plant: 
1057 State St. Springfield Tel. RE 3-9297 




1207 SUMNER AVENUE 
Springfield, Mass. Tel. RE 4-9222 

Exclusive Decorator 

Wallpapers & Wallcoverings 
Hours: Daily 8 - 5 :30 — Fri. 8 - 9 P.M. 



WALTER WHITTUM, INC. 
• Printing * 

Our work at Walter Whittum, Inc. is putting ink on various surfaces according 
to your requirements. Whatever your need — a simple label or a complicated 
four-color many-paged brochure — we take pride in giving you the job you 
want. Artwork, typography, photography and plate-making are all things we 
do for your OK prior to actual printing by the most suitable process. Our 
modern, efficient equipment can help you with any graphic arts problem, and 
we will use skill, speed, imagination, economy, ingenuity and precision in 
whichever order you wish. A photographic studio for color pictures of people 
and products, for separations, and new plate-making equipment make our fine 
color printing more economical than ever. 

WALTER WHITTUM, INC. • SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 









160 



9 



BEST WISHES TO THE 

CLASS OF '60 



FROM THE 

CLASS OF '63 



§ 
§ 

§ 



Inland Marine Center, Inc. 




739 LIBERTY STREET 




Springfield, Massachusetts 


Road Construction 




and Parking Lots 


Evinrude Sales and Service 
Complete Marine Accessories 
Finest Boats Obtainable 


RICHARDI 
CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. 


River Location and Launching Ramp 
foot of 


Telephone 
REpublic 6-3532 — REpubhc 2-4080 


Elm Street at Memorial Bridge 





X^'-^'^-'-<^-<^-'-^''-^<^-'-^''-^'<^-'-<^''-rf > "^ 



161 



I2li: 



9 



\ 

f KELLOGG A. F. SMITH, INC. 

| Builder of Distinctive Homes 




FIRST in Personal Service 



Quality homes at reasonable cost through 
careful planning & constant supervision 

— Office and Residence — 

134 HILLCREST AVENUE 

Longmeadow, Mass. 

Tel. LO 7-8189 — LO 7-5227 




§ 
§ 



ENJOY 

Excellent Food 

Congenial Atmosphere 

Attentive Service 

THE STUDENT PRINCE 

AND 

FORT RESTAURANT 

FORT ST. (Just off MAIN) 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



and CUSTOM 



CLEANERS | 



333 BELMONT AVENUE 



ANDERSON-LITTLE CO. 

Manufacturers of fine clothing 

for 

Men — Women — Boys 

718 STATE STREET 
Open 9:30 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. Daily 



162 



9 



KELLEHER & MIXER, INC 

464 ST. JAMES AVENUE 
Telephone REpublic 3-3 1 16 

Imperial — Chrysler — Plymouth 
Lancia and Fiat 



Compliments 
of 

BILL 'N BRAD 




JOSEPH CHAPDELAINE 
& SONS, INC. 

154 PONDVIEW DRIVE 

Springfield, Massachusetts 

Contractors and Builders 



X^'-<^-'-^-'-<^^''^-'-^''^'<^'-<^'<^-M^''-tf > **-^ 



163 



X5 > *<^ , X<^<-<5 > "K-^^"K<5 > X^-V^<<^"><^<<^<^*^-<^ 



Compliments of 

W. F. YOUNG, INC. 

Manufacturers of 
ABSORBINE, JR. 



Compliments of 

LONGMEADOW GARAGE 

Stanley Karcz, Prop. 

467 LONGMEADOW STREET 
Longmeadow, Massachusetts 



Best Wishes for Success 
to the 

CLASS OF 1960 



X5^5*K^^-<^^<^ t <5'"*^ < -^-<5 > ^^ t ^'-<5^ 



164 






H. KLEMPNER CO. 


EAST LONGMEADOW 




PHARMACY 


Wholesale Jewelers 


Prescription Specialists 


Watch Material and Supplies 


Have your prescriptions 




phoned by your doctor 


Telephone REpublic 3-3861 


Telephone LA 5-3664 


60 VERNON STREET 


Free Delivery Service 


Springfield 3, Massachusetts 


10 Shaker Rd., 7 Prospect St., Longmeadow 



BEST WISHES FOR SUCCESS 

to the 

LANCERS 

From all the 
Families living in Longmeadow 



X^^-'^-'^'^-^^" , ^'<^-'-<^<-^'X^'-<^--^'<^-0^^.<^t^.^ 



165 



9 




1 



NATHAN COHEN 

Wholesale Jeweler 

"In the Bowles Building" 

1618 MAIN STREET 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



* t 

t 



Compliments of 



f phlmei: Mass. 



§ 



166 



X^ ,t ^ < ^v^*'^ v ^^^*^<*^<^ , <^'^^*^<-^^^ 5 ^ t -^ t< ^ < ^'<^'^^ 



Best Wishes to the 



CLASS OF 1960 



STEPHENS STORES, INC. 

Full Lines of Thibaut Wallpaper 
Valspar paints 

2165 MAIN STREET 

Open Thursday and Friday nights 
Until 9 

Telephone REpublic 2-5019 



Contact Lenses — Eyeglasses 
by 

JOHN B. BOYD 

Optician 

308 BRIDGE ST. AT THE "X' 
Westover Air Force Base 

Telephone REpublic 3-4470 



M & L PLASTIC CORP. 

EASTHAMPTON, 
MASSACHUSETTS 



^^'■^••■^'■^^■^•'-^•'-^^■^•'-^^■C^^-^^-'-C r --C^^>'-'-C^^-^^^^-^6 r ^-^ 



167 



WM 



9 




BLANC PHARMACY, INC. 

at the "X" 
520 SUMNER AVENUE 

Prescription Specialists 

Free Delivery Service 

Telephone REpublic 3-3795 



Sanded and Refinished 

Telephone ST 2-4065 

Prompt, Moderate Estimates 

J. J. GLEASON CO. 

183 PATRICIA CIRCLE 

Springfield, Massachusetts 

| 




168 



9 



Compliments 
of 

LIBERTY SHRINKERS, INC. 



yM?»-$& 



FOR CAMERA 
PORTRAITS THAT 

SATISFY THE 
CRITICAL EYE... 

Choose 

HAUSAMANN STUDIO 

286 BRIDGE STREET 

Springfield, Massachusetts 

Telephone REpublic 3-7876 



X^-^' , -^-'.^.v^-'^''-<^'<^''-i^-<^'y^<-i^''-<£ , " > M^-<^ 




169 



X^<-i?"*-^<<5 , "*<5**-<?^<-<5 > "x<^v^<-<5 > ^^ 





"Bank Day" at the Lancer Savings Bank, a Junior Achievement Company, pro- 
vides the opportunity for Longmeadow High School students to save ahead for 
the things they need and want. 

But the need for saving does not end with graduation. How you handle your 
money will play an important part in your happiness, for if you spend unwisely, 
you will find your money gone and your real goals still unattained. 
Make this important decision now — that you will save regularly. Lancer bank 
books may always be used at any S.I.S. office, or we will be glad to open a new 
book if you have none. 

SPRINGFIELD INSTITUTION 
FOR SAVINGS 

63 ELM STREET 

561 SUMNER AVENUE 844 STATE STREET 

Springfield, Massachusetts 

9 Springfield Street, Agawam 155 Longmeadow Street, Longmeadow 

A MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK 



§ A MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK § 

I I 



170 






§ 



ann 

dunbar 

shops 



infants 



boys & girls 



teens 



juniors 



misses 



§ 

& shaker road, 
| east longmeadow, 
§ mass. 



THE 
DRUM SHOP 

and 
TEMPLE 

of 
MUSIC 

Musical 
Instruments 

ACCORDIONS 

TRUMPETS 

TROMBONES 

CLARINETS 

SAXOPHONES 

VIOLINS 

DRUMS 

VIBRAPHONES 

GUITARS 

BANJOS 

SHEET MUSIC 

188 

STATE STREET 

Springfield, 

Massachusetts 

Telephone : 
REpublic 4-0309 
REpublic 3-3935 




It isn't a home . . . until it's planted! 

LAWNS — Care, Plantings 

Asphalt Paving 

Landscape Contractors 

Thomas P. Ryland Co., Inc. 

Telephone REpublic 4-7943 
67 JAMES ST. SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Compliments of 

WESTFIELD METAL 
PRODUCTS CO., INC. 

WESTFIELD, 
MASSACHUSETTS 



X^'w^'t^'-^*^-^<^<'-^<<^<<^-'-i^v^<^''-<^^-<<^-^'<^'V^ 



171 



■ 



X5^<<?^^J>1(^l(^X^H^^(^^.^t^X^^V^X^^^^^^H^t^ 



C. A. KROHNE & SONS, INC. 

AUTOMOTIVE AND INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTORS 

Since 1912 




FORD SALES 

"We sell the best and service the rest" 

Visit Our Showroom — Open Evenings 

CARS — TRUCKS 

Telephone ST 8-9668 

250 Springfield St. Agawam, Mass. 




The Window Cleaning SERVICE 

... for Particular People 

General Cleaning Contractors 

ANDERSON & CO. 

43 WESTERN CIRCLE 
East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Telephone LA 5-3353 



X5'^^v^^<^<^*^**^ t -tf^<5 > *^<^'-<^ < -^ > ^ 



172 



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| LUMBERJACK STORES, INC. 

630 ENFIELD STREET 
Thompsonville, Connecticut 

Next to First National Store 



"Complete Department Stores of 
Building Materials" 



Phone: LO 7-5 167 

Longmeadow Beauty Salon 

151 LONGMEADOW STREET 
Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Air Conditioned 



§ 



MACDONALD & JOHNSON, INC. 

F. I. Johnson, Robert J. Cary, Pierre Angers II, Nelson F. Kilburn 

INSURANCE 

THIRD NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 

Serving Greater Springfield Since 1918 



173 






LONGMEADOW PHARMACY, INC. 

159 LONGMEADOW STREET 
Longmeadow, Massachusetts 



Telephone LO 7-3750 



Compliments of 

VALLEY CINEMA, INC. 

and 

VALLEY SOUND CORP. 

958 STATE ST. SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

Telephone REpublic 6-4576 



Refresh... 




add zest 

to the hour 

Bottled under Authority of the Coca-Cola Co. 

| The Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 



of Springfield, Massachusetts 



§ 33PlainfieldSt. Telephone RE 2-7435 
* 



HAYDEN 
WAYSIDE FURNITURE 

THOMPSONVILLE, CONN. 
Just below Longmeadow 




For any room in the home visit 

Hayden Wayside Furniture 
where you will always find . . . 

QUALITY — SERVICE — SAVINGS 



^O"*-^<&^ , -0'^&<^^ , ~^<-^'-'^~&~*^<*^'~& v -^<-& v -&'*^<~0™^ 



174 



9 $ 



AM#*g. 



Telephone REpublic 4-9407 

WHITE'S LAUNDRYMART 

We Are As Near To You As Your Phone 
8 Hours — Fast Service — 8 Hours 



845 MAIN STREET 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



Sports Cars of Spfld., Inc. 

Your Dependable Dealer 

M.G. A. — Austin Healey — Sprite 

Porsche — Hillman — Sunbeam 

Morris — Austin — Vespa — Humber 

NEW AND USED CARS 

567 MAIN STREET 
Springfield, Massachusetts 

Telephone ST 8-0979 



PARAMOUNT THEATRE 



SHOW PLACE OF WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS 



| HALLEN CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. 

) Pipelines and Bridges 

§ 139 PARAMOUNT STREET, SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

4270 AUSTIN BOULEVARD, ISLAND PARK, NEW YORK 

§ 
& 



175 



X^<-<^ < -^ t -<5 > ^<5*K^<«5 > ^^<-<^t<^<^<^ 



SIMONE 
UPHOLSTERING CO. 

Telephone REpublic 2-6007 

Custom Re-Upholstering — Slip Covers & 
Draperies — New Furniture Made To Order 

447 DICKINSON STREET 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



At the X 



Ray Simone 



Your Fifth Ave. Florist at the "X" 




^^flORIST 

513 BELMONT AVENUE 

Springfield 8, Massachusetts 

Flowers of Distinction for Every Occasion 
Joseph J. Mascaro, Prop. Tel. RE 3-94 1 1 



Call Evenings RE 2-6752 — ST 2-2555 
Thirty-Four Years' Teaching 

CHIEF WALMER'S § 

DRIVING SCHOOL 

Dual Control Cars 
Formerly instructor for Technical, Classical, & 
Cathedral High Schools 

We Call For You 

19 NORFOLK STREET 

Springfield, Massachusetts 






% 

Ansco — Kodak — Graflex — Polaroid ? 
Equipment for the Amateur and Professional § 
SVE Strip Film and Ampro Sound Projectors 

UNITED PHOTO SUPPLY f 

445 DICKINSON STREET 
Springfield, Massachusetts 

Telephone REpublic 3-5447 



176 



"9 ^Ba^^^HMOT i-h^ KaHH^BH S" 




When you graduate it's wonderful to have a telephone job waiting 
for you. You'll love the friendly new people you meet. And you'll 
like the excellent salary, the regular increases, the opportunities for 
advancement and the many additional benefits that make working 
for the Telephone Company so attractive to so many young people. 

Telephone jobs are important ones. We have our own training 
program which you can enter without any previous job experience. 

Why not come and see our employment interviewer soon . . . before 
you graduate. Ask the Guidance Counselor at your school to tell you 
when and where to apply. 

NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY 



X^'^*^'-^<^ < ^'-<^'<^'<^'-^«^''-^--<5 r ><-<^'^'-<^ 



177 



X^<-<^^<<5 > ^<<5 > ^^<-<5*><-c^-<^<^^ 





FOREST PRODUCTS CO. 


MAX ORENSTEIN 


OF EAST LONGMEADOW, INC. 


Plumbing and Heating 


Lumber — Paints — Hardware 




Millwork — Free Estimating 


SPRINGFIELD, 




MASSACHUSETTS 


95 SHAKER ROAD 




East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 


Telephone RE 2-6415 






Telephone ST 8-7095 — LA 5-3337 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

THE J. G. & P. C. CICIARELLI AGENCY 

MUTUAL OF OMAHA 

The Home of Complete Insurance Service 
SICKNESS — HOSPITALIZATION — ACCIDENT 

Individual — Family — Group 

World's Largest Exclusive Health and Accident Company. Over $2,000,000.00 
In Claims Paid Each Week. LOCAL CLAIM SERVICE 

UNITED BENEFIT LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 
LIFE - OLD AGE - RETIREMENT - ANNUITIES 

Underwriters for America's Foremost General Insurance Companies 

AUTOMOBILE - FIRE - MARINE - BONDS - BURGLARY - GLASS - CASUALTY 

HEAD OFFICE: 145 STATE STREET, SPRINGFIELD REpublic 7-4771 

District Office: 

332 Main Street, Worcester, PLeasant 3-6416 

Remember yesterday is history! 
Tomorrow is a mystery . . . ? 



Xi5**-<^v^"y?^^t-^v^<-tf^t-^--^^^v^:«5 > ->^^ 



178 



X^ v -^**^^' v -^~^™-^' x ^' < -^ ( <5 > *^-<4^<-^ ) ™^-<-^< > ^ t <^<-^ t «5^ 



SUNTER'S 
DRUG STORE 

Wm. F. Sunter, Reg. Pharmacist 
165 OAKLAND STREET 

Telephone ST 8-4562 — ST 8-4561 



SCHERMERHORN 
FISH MARKETS, INC. 

13 Stockbridge St. 735 Sumner Ave. 
RE 2-5102-3-4 RE 7-0672 

510 Armory St. 

RE 7-2027 



§irA<gY 

Bu/iotm of Smcial Macmimm ■ Coktdact Machim Won* 



X^^*^'-<^'<^-'.^-<^^'.<^.<^<^.<^.--^^^ 



179 



Growing with YOU . . . 

tomorrow's leaders 

GAS is widely accepted as a fuel for most Domestic, Com- 
mercial and Industrial applications where any form of heat is 
required. 

The Springfield GAS Light Company is growing rapidly and 
has doubled its sale of GAS in the last five years. GAS IS IN 
CONSTANT DEMAND and the industry has tremendous op- 
portunities for YOU . . . whether you are looking for unlimited 
job opportunities or just wish to secure the best in appliances. 

The Springfield GAS Light Company now serves nearly 2,000 homes in 
Longmeadow and we sincerely hope to serve you! 






Compliments of 



BOB'S VARIETY STORE 



"The Store With Friendly Service" 



At The State Line 



Compliments of 

TOWN SHOP 

LONGMEADOW STREET 
Cor. Benedict Ter. 



X5 > >^^<-^'^^.^<-^<-<^^^<^^^>C^t^V.^<^>X^V.^V^}l^V^>lt^»l^*<^^ 



180 



Compliments of 






Compliments of 


IDEAL BUDGET PLAN, INC. 


THOREN, INC. 


1421 MAIN STREET, corner Vernon Sr. 




Springfield, Massachusetts 


OPTICIANS 


Paul Berman, Pres. 


Distinctive Eyewear — Contact Lenses 



Best Wishes from the 



CLASS OF '62 






''-<S>^^<^--<5 > ^-<^'M^'-<5>v^'^'v5''>m^ 



181 



^mm 



LONGMEADOW LAUNDRY 




3 EDGEWOOD AVENUE 




Under new management 


NATIONAL GAGE 


QUALITY 


AND DIE CO. 


Dry Cleaning & Laundering 

(Shirts, too; of course) 

at reasonable prices 


11 RAMAH CIRCLE, AGAWAM 
Joseph and Ed Najaka 


for pickup and delivery 




Telephone LO 7-5036 





Compliments of 



R. E. PHELON CO., INC. 



§ 



182 



9 



Picture of dependability 







-HOI A OKIi'S LARGEST FUEL OIL COMPANY" 



irAIEir OIL CO. >nc 

Donald S. Tufts, President 






LONGMEADOW 
BARBER SHOP 

Anthony Alaimo, Proprietor 

Three First Class Barbers 
16 BLISS ROAD 



MIDTOWN RECREATION 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

2 ORANGE STREET 

Springfield, Massachusetts 

RE 4-9729 DiCarlo Bros., Prop. 



^Cr^^r.'-^^^0-''-Cr.'yy--^^---Cr.'-C^--Cr^-C'-'-Cr^J^'^C^''-0'-'-C r '^ 



183 



X^'*<? - x-<^^J?'x-<5>x<^c<J> - ><-^-<^t<5>^ 






GUTHRIE FENCE CO., INC 

765 COLUMBUS AVENUE 
Springfield 5 , Massachusetts 

Tel. RE 6-3234 or RE 3-3901 



KELLY-FRADET 
LUMBER CO., INC. 

557 NORTH MAIN STREET 

EAST LONGMEADOW, MASS. 

RE 3-6681 

Everything in Building Materials 
for the Home Owner 

Open all day Saturday 

We give S & H Green Stamps 

Local Representative: E. J. "Ned" Cummings 
186 WILLIAMS STREET 
LONGMEADOW, MASS. 

LO 7-7230 



Compliments of 

LEWIS ZUNDELL 

Hardware — Paint — Wallpaper 

770 MAIN STREET 
Springfield, Massachusetts 

Telephone REpublic 3-0912 



HOMES OF DISTINCTION 
BY ROY PROVENCHER 

68 LYNNWOOD ROAD 

Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Telephone LO 7-3970 



184 



Y L &V*&*^^^V^V^**&*^*^^K&T*^.<^^^*^-<~^<-^<J?--<*0^<^V^.<^^v9^^ 



Welcome Your Stanley Dealer 




STANLEY HOME PRODUCTS, INC. 

WESTFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

STANLEY LEADS with more than 250 Quality-Plus Products demon- 
strated exclusively at STANLEY Hostess Parties: Waxes, Polishes, Dusters, 
Mops, Brooms, Brushes, Cleaning Chemicals to save time, work and money 
in housekeeping. Toilette Articles, Bath Accessories, Cosmetics, Personal 
and Clothing Brushes and many other attractive items to improve the 
family's grooming. 

Originators of the Famous Stanley Hostess Party Plan 




X^'-^-<^'-<^^*^<^*<^'<^'^*^<^--<i^<^^ 



185 









Compliments of 




E. J. PINNEY CO., INC. 


Compliments of 


General Contractors 


SMITH PHARMACY, INC. 




Corner BLISS ROAD and 


* 


LONGMEADOW STREET 




Longmeadow, Massachusetts 


SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 






New England's Greatest Name In The 

• Designing • Building • Equipping 

and Supplying of 

BEAUTY SALONS 

• Manufacturing Chemists 

c§ Italwu^J^alwlaJMi^ 



17 Stearns Square 



Springfield, Mass. 






RE 6-1816 



186 



X^v^v^v^v^^v^t^.o^<^*^.< < ^<^x^.<^v^<*^^<^x^ 



IN SPRINGFIELD 



Compliments of 



LIBRARY BOOK HOUSE 



WEST SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 




GUENTHER & HANDEL 
DELICATESSEN 



— offers the newest and finest of 
fancy groceries from the U.S.A. and y 
far countries. 



REAL DELICATESSEN 

with the Continental 
flavor and variety. 

Cold Meats & Fine Sausage 

Excellent Salads 

Continental Type Breads 

Imported & Domestic 
Cheeses-Chocolates-Wines 

Since 1903 at 
17 STOCKBRIDGE ST. 




My Best Regards 
to the 

GRADUATING CLASS OF '60 



ELCEE BUILDERS, INC. 



Quality Homes 

PHILIP R. COHN 
Vice-President 



X^'<^*^'<^^^*-^'<^*^*^'-^«<^"*^' P -^ , "K^'<-^ v -^'*^^^'*^ > >^«^^ 



187 



X£? r *<J^^ t -£ ;> *<^**^<<? - *«^-<«^<<5 > ^v^-t^<-^^ 



Best Wishes To 
The 

CLASS OF # 60 

and 

LONGMEADOW HIGH SCHOOL 



A 






Congratulations and Best Wishes 


Qiillyouje ltd 


to 
The Class of I960 


Clothiers — Haberdashers 


ALBERT E. MAYER 


REPUBLIC 9-1226 


"Plumbing of Stability" 


89 STATE STREET 


419-425 MAIN STREET 


SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 


Springfield, Massachusetts 


Free Parking 




Member Main-State Assoc. 





§ 

§ 
§ 

§ 



188 



Compliments of 


PARMENTER 
AUTO PARTS CO., INC. 


LANDEN-TRUE, INC 


E. P. Killeen, President 


Jewelry — Silversmiths 


Auto Replacement Parts 
Machine Shop Service 


"Quality Jewelers Since 1862" 


611 MAIN STREET 


1390 MAIN STREET 


Springfield, Massachusetts 


Springfield, Massachusetts 


Telephone REpublic 2-7466-67 



Best Wishes for Success 



from 



THE CLASS OF "61 



// 



X^'-«^'*.«^-^*^'-<^-m^<<^'<^*^<<^<<^>'-<5>-»^^ 



189 



^VA- 



9 



MR. JEROME B'SHARA 


Compliments of 


Longmeadow Builder 


THE M. J. O'MALLEY 




COMPANY 


* 


Printers and Lithographers 




* 


778 LONGMEADOW STREET 




Longmeadow, Massachusetts 


SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



FIBERWOOD CONTAINERS, INC. 

490 SOUTH WESTFIELD STREET 
Feeding Hills, Massachusetts 



§ 
§ 

§ 
I 



190 



9 



Compliments of 


YOUTH CENTRE 


STERLING A. ORR, 


Outfitters to Young New England 


INCORPORATED 






• 


Your Cadillac Distributor 




10 MILL STREET 


1496 MAIN STREET 


Springfield, Massachusetts 


Springfield, Massachusetts 



SOULIERE BUILDING CORPORATION 

49 DRURY LANE 
Longmeadow, Massachusetts 



Telephone LO 7-8324 



X^*^^-«^'-<^A<^-<^'V^v^'<^'v^*^<t^----<5>^^<^^ 



191 



You Expect MORE from 

THE RED LION SHOP 

You Get MORE from 

THE RED LION SHOP 

Better Variety, Better Value, Better Quality 

Fine Furniture — Rugs — Draperies 
Interior Decorations 

627 STATE STREET 

Springfield, Massachusetts 

Open Thursday Evenings till Nine 
George E. Lanciaux, Arthur M. Lanciaux 







IIBIS 



y^j, PEACE OF MIND 
T rtf YOUR PETROLEUM NEEDS 



F. L ROBERTS & CO., INC. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



SCOTT M. STEARNS 

and 
BARBARA WESTCOTT 

REALTORS 
153 LONGMEADOW STREET 

Homes — Land 



Telephone REpublic 3-1 105 

McCarthy 
drug co., inc. 

"AT THE X" 

N. S. Davis, R. Ph., J. M. Hughes, R. Ph. 

512 SUMNER AVENUE 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



\&O^-O r *-&v-0*-&*- 



192 



X^^x^v*5^<^t^<^*<^.<^v^v^.v^^'v^.t^t^v^t^i^<^<^ 



For the BEST in Office Equipment 
GET YOR OFFICE NEEDS AT 

REID'S 



100 STATE STREET 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



BELMONT 
DRIVING SCHOOL, INC. 

Complete Driver Education 

Insurance Reduction 
Classes Year Round 

Afternoon and Evening Courses 

39 D WIGHT STREET RE 9-0334 



Compliments of 

LONGMEADOW 
FOOD CENTER 

408 LONGMEADOW STREET 
Longmeadow, Massachusetts 



PIONEER VALLEY 
REAL ESTATE AGENCY 

HAROLD M. CATLIN, Realtor 

Exclusive Representatives 

TRANSAMERICAN 
Real Estate Corp. 

471 LONGMEADOW STREET 
Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Telephone LO 7-3640 



X^^^-<^v-^*^'<^*^'<^'^^'-^<^'<-^ - ^'<^'<-^'^'*^^ 



193 



Xl?*<5*><^^<-c5 >_ ><^ > *^<-^ - >Vi^^*<- < ^^.t<^i<^c^.t^^ 




BRIAN 
LINCOLN MERCURY, INC. 

"New England's Highest Traders" 

1566 STATE ST., OPPOSITE A&P 
Springfield, Massachusetts 

Holmes W. Roster Tel. ST 5-5347 



H. L ROSS, INC. 

71 MARKET STREET 
Springfield, Massachusetts 

Interior Decorators — Painting Contractors 

Distinctive Wallcovering 

Expert Workmanship 







Urt|$am*3$ 



W0*&*&*/?v*&v&>i0*0™&*&*&v&r^Y&v&v*0*0K0v^ 



194 







588 Longmeadow Street Telephone LO 7-3371 Longmeadow, Mass. 



Catalog Sent Upon Request 



BAY PATH 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Courses of Study : 

Executive Secretarial 

Medical Secretarial 

Fine Arts 

§ 

h 

§ FIRST IN QUALITY, FIRST IN SERVICE 



Compliments to 

The Class of '60 
from your 

LONGMEADOW 
COMMUNITY MARKET 

GERD SCHNEIDER, Proprietor 




Telephone REpublic 6-47 1 1 

I. M. PRESS FORMAL SHOP 

"We Will Impress You 
With Our Service" 

CORRECT FORMAL DRESS 

Tuxedos, Full Dress, Cutaways 

Strollers, White Dinner Jackets 

All Accessories 

326 D WIGHT STREET 

Springfield, Massachusetts 



195 



X:5 > *<5**-^v5>'x*5 > T<^<<5 , ^v^'<-(^<^<^<<^t^^ 



CARBORUNDUM 
COMPANY 



WEST SPRINGFIELD 
MASSACHUSETTS 



§ 

? Compliments of 
\ 

\ ATLANTIC ALUMINUM 

| and 

| METAL DISTRIBUTORS, INC. 



§ 



177 PAGE BOULEVARD 
Springfield, Massachusetts 

Telephone REpublic 9-961 1 



FULL INSURANCE REDUCTION 

To All 
Graduates of our Driver Ed. Classes 

FAIRBANKS 
AUTO SCHOOL 

Est. 1909 
20 DWIGHT STREET 

Telephone REpublic 3-0458 



FRANK M. PAGE, INC. 

"Artistry in Flowers" 

43 MAPLE STREET 
East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Telephone LA 5-3929 



iltC?V^<^--&V^<^<^<^U^^V^<^-~&V^*'^V-&V^<^K^^ 



196 



X^<^V^<^V^>TI^"><^T>C^<^<^V^.V^^V^.V^t^V^O^V^H^ 



l 



M. J. KITTREDGE, INC, 
JEWELERS 

1354 MAIN STREET 
Springfield, Massachusetts 

Headquarters for Charms and Charm 
Bracelets — Gold and Sterling Stiver 

Sterling Silver Sorority Rings made to Order 



"Oil Heat Makes Warm Friends" 

GRIMALDI BROTHERS 

Range and Fuel Oils 

1121 COLUMBUS AVENUE 

Springfield, Massachusetts 

Bus. Tel. ST 8-9661 

Service Tel. LO 7-5485, Res. Tel. RE 3-8650 

SSI 

IC0MOMICAL 



X^*^*^'-^*^'<-^^'"*^'<^'-^"*^'<^''-^''^^*^*^^^'<-^''><-^^ 2 



197 



M. L SCHMITT, INC. 



Electrical Contractors 



Construction Maintenance 

371 TAYLOR STREET 

Telephone REpublic 3-7868 



Compliments of 

LONGMEADOW 
HARDWARE 

477 LONGMEADOW STREET 
Longmeadow, Massachusetts 



IHi 



il 



I 



X^<^><^^^><^><^^<^<^1^^<^^^>^>V?»^><^^^1-^^ 





Gifts Diamonds Watches 




Telephone REpublic 2-6500 




OPTICIAN 


Compliments of 






ALBERT J. FACEY 


INTERSTATE TIRE 


Jeweler at the X 




Complete Jewelry Repair Service 




SPRINGFIELD : : MASSACHUSETTS 




539 SUMNER AVENUE 




573 BELMONT AVENUE 



Compliments of 

BLOOM'S PHOTO SUPPLY, INC. 

211-213 WORTHINGTON ST. SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

Telephone REpublic 7-3567 



Telephone REpublic 3-3882 

P. E. MURPHY 

Prescription Optician 

329 BRIDGE STREET 
Springfield, Massachusetts 




XJ>>^K^(^^^><^^^^<^>^^>^ >l ^^^ ! ^ 1! ^^^^ 



198 








199 






w 



MASACKSIC STAFF 
1960 



Editor-in-Chief . . Stephen Shatz 

Assistant Editor Sallie Baldwin 

Literary Editor Carolyn Paige 

Photography Editor Elliot Bloom 

Art Editor Sally Neef 

Assistant Art Editor Sally Martin 

Business Managers William Adams 

Richard Kimball 

Sales Managers Douglass Ellis 

Barbara Chapin 

Patrons Editors Peter Strople 

Linda Wright 

Sports' Co-ordinator William Cox 

Boys' Sports Editor William Klempner 

Girls' Sports Editor Eline Dierauf 

Secretary Elizabeth Katten 

Treasurer Michael Mazer 

Typing Editor Patricia Gould 

Advisors Mr Maurice Suher 

Mrs. Ann Pelczarski 
Miss Lillian Erickson 



200 



*. o'toole * sons 

incorporated 
offset printers and binders since 1H!)1 

31 jefferson at. • Stamford, conn. 



W 3 * 





All Uxi'WerU 




1 




AA 



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